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The Eastern Orthodox tradition considers John the Baptist as the last of the Old Testament, or covenant, prophets, who shares the stage with world rulers of the time. John is thus effectively placed amid world events at a culmination of the old and the dawn of something new in the history of salvation. electricity vs gas heating costs Christianity proclaims the incarnation of God in real time and in a real place.

The Baptist’s call to repent was the same as his predecessors’ and Jesus Christ, his successor, continued the call in the new covenant. In the Greek text, the word that translates as “repent” in English was metanoia, which is a call for a change of heart or mind. In modern times, however, repentance has come to mean “feeling sorry for, or regret about.” This is not what John or his predecessors (or Jesus) was asking of people. Otherwise, how can one say the kingdom of God is at hand? When the kingdom is truly “at hand,” the call is for a change of heart to become fully engaged in the gospel, rather than to repent so the kingdom may come. The gospel of salvation is not legalistic.

The gospel of salvation, while personal, is community oriented rather than individualistic. All those engaged as disciples, prepare together the way of the Lord. Thus John’s ministry of baptism is preparatory to the Lord’s coming. John declares, “Prepare the way of the Lord” (v. 4). His message is the message of Advent, a message of preparation.

As the second week of Advent begins, preparations for the coming of the Lord are well underway in our congregations and our homes. For many, this is a time to clean the house, put away ordinary items, and decorate for Christmas. gas efficient cars 2015 Some may be preparing for family and friends to come for visits or meals. Congregations may have special programs; many schools have holiday festivities with children’s choral programs or special treats.

Yet all our preparation takes place in the context of local and world events. We prepare despite what is going on in the world around us, yet we are surely affected by those events. Christ came and is coming all the time. Advent expresses our hope in Christ’s peace. Community of Christ echoes the call of John on the banks of the Jordan to repent and be made whole—to join us in Christ’s mission of peace—so all may experience God’s saving grace. Central Ideas

God, you are called by many names, but our prayer today calls on you as the Prince of Peace. We long for your peace: peace of mind, peace in our families, peace at work, peace in all lands. We leave our worries, fears, and doubts at your feet and breathe in your peace. We know we are distracted by the “what ifs” of life, but we come to you in faithfulness to replace the “what ifs” with courage, strength, and hope, even in the chaos and frustrations of life. Our prayer is that we keep our eyes on you and not the things of the world. We pray our hearts will be at peace. When we arise each day with your peace in our hearts, we pray others will see in our words and deeds that our peace comes from you.

Advent teaches us metaphorical lessons through the image of pregnancy. Although waiting for the birth of a child is difficult, if we rush quickly to the end it will diminish the quality of life for the baby. A baby needs each day between conception and birth to grow. gas house dance hall This is true for us in our spiritual lives, too. We learn to live with discomfort and the unknown. We learn to settle into the waiting time. Advent reminds us to go inward and be patient with the discomfort.

In the fifteenth year of the reign of Emperor Tiberius, when Pontius Pilate was governor of Judea, and Herod was ruler of Galilee, and his brother Philip ruler of the region of Ituraea and Trachonitis, and Lysanias ruler of Abilene, during the high priesthood of Annas and Caiaphas, the word of God came to John son of Zechariah in the wilderness. He went into all the region around the Jordan, proclaiming a baptism of repentance for the forgiveness of sins, as it is written in the book of the words of the prophet Isaiah,

Today we celebrate the second Sunday in Advent. John the Baptist teaches about the coming reign of God while quoting the Old Testament prophet, Isaiah. e sampark electricity bill payment In the ancient world, those who lived in the desert were separate from those who lived in protected, walled cities. City dwellers were the mainstream of society. Those from the wilderness or desert lived outside those societal norms without material goods and comforts. This passage reminds us that information about the reign of God, or Zion, comes from the margins of society, not from the mainstream.

Isaiah and John use the symbolism of mountains, valleys, and roads to talk about the reign of God. In their description, the coming of God’s peaceable kingdom means people no longer will experience extreme obstacles and hardships, and broken systems will be fixed. John makes it clear that God’s peaceable kingdom is available to all people.

The Eastern Orthodox tradition considers John the Baptist as the last of the Old Testament, or covenant, prophets, who shares the stage with world rulers of the time. John is thus effectively placed amid world events at a culmination of the old and the dawn of something new in the history of salvation. Christianity proclaims the incarnation of God in real time and in a real place.

The Baptist’s call to repent was the same as his predecessors’ and Jesus Christ, his successor, continued the call in the new covenant. In the Greek text, the word that translates as “repent” in English was metanoia, which is a call for a change of heart or mind. grade 6 electricity unit plan In modern times, however, repentance has come to mean “feeling sorry for, or regret about.” This is not what John or his predecessors (or Jesus) was asking of people. Otherwise, how can one say the kingdom of God is at hand? When the kingdom is truly “at hand,” the call is for a change of heart to become fully engaged in the gospel, rather than to repent so the kingdom may come. The gospel of salvation is not legalistic.

The gospel of salvation, while personal, is community oriented rather than individualistic. All those engaged as disciples, prepare together the way of the Lord. Thus John’s ministry of baptism is preparatory to the Lord’s coming. John declares, “Prepare the way of the Lord” (v. 4). His message is the message of Advent, a message of preparation.

As the second week of Advent begins, preparations for the coming of the Lord are well underway in our congregations and our homes. For many, this is a time to clean the house, put away ordinary items, and decorate for Christmas. Some may be preparing for family and friends to come for visits or meals. gas examples matter Congregations may have special programs; many schools have holiday festivities with children’s choral programs or special treats.

Yet all our preparation takes place in the context of local and world events. We prepare despite what is going on in the world around us, yet we are surely affected by those events. Christ came and is coming all the time. Advent expresses our hope in Christ’s peace. Community of Christ echoes the call of John on the banks of the Jordan to repent and be made whole—to join us in Christ’s mission of peace—so all may experience God’s saving grace. Central Ideas

God, you are called by many names, but our prayer today calls on you as the Prince of Peace. We long for your peace: peace of mind, peace in our families, peace at work, peace in all lands. hp gas kushaiguda phone number We leave our worries, fears, and doubts at your feet and breathe in your peace. We know we are distracted by the “what ifs” of life, but we come to you in faithfulness to replace the “what ifs” with courage, strength, and hope, even in the chaos and frustrations of life. Our prayer is that we keep our eyes on you and not the things of the world. We pray our hearts will be at peace. When we arise each day with your peace in our hearts, we pray others will see in our words and deeds that our peace comes from you.

Advent teaches us metaphorical lessons through the image of pregnancy. Although waiting for the birth of a child is difficult, if we rush quickly to the end it will diminish the quality of life for the baby. A baby needs each day between conception and birth to grow. This is true for us in our spiritual lives, too. We learn to live with discomfort and the unknown. We learn to settle into the waiting time. i electricity bill com Advent reminds us to go inward and be patient with the discomfort.

In the fifteenth year of the reign of Emperor Tiberius, when Pontius Pilate was governor of Judea, and Herod was ruler of Galilee, and his brother Philip ruler of the region of Ituraea and Trachonitis, and Lysanias ruler of Abilene, during the high priesthood of Annas and Caiaphas, the word of God came to John son of Zechariah in the wilderness. He went into all the region around the Jordan, proclaiming a baptism of repentance for the forgiveness of sins, as it is written in the book of the words of the prophet Isaiah,

Today we celebrate the second Sunday in Advent. John the Baptist teaches about the coming reign of God while quoting the Old Testament prophet, Isaiah. In the ancient world, those who lived in the desert were separate from those who lived in protected, walled cities. City dwellers were the mainstream of society. Those from the wilderness or desert lived outside those societal norms without material goods and comforts. This passage reminds us that information about the reign of God, or Zion, comes from the margins of society, not from the mainstream.

Isaiah and John use the symbolism of mountains, valleys, and roads to talk about the reign of God. In their description, the coming of God’s peaceable kingdom means people no longer will experience extreme obstacles and hardships, and broken systems will be fixed. John makes it clear that God’s peaceable kingdom is available to all people.