15 Must-have mig welding tools and accessories hagerty articles gsa 2016 calendar

A MIG welder is a very versatile tool for the car lover. They can be used to replace rusty sheet metal, fabricate brackets, remove stuck fasteners, and the more powerful versions can even tackle frame repair. When first starting MIG welding there are absolute necessities and there are tools that make the job much more comfortable and speed up things up. Here are our favorite must-have tools and accessories that we can’t live without:

• Gloves. Welding involves intense heat. It’s melting steel after all. TIG gloves are thinner and allow for more dexterity, but offer less insulation. MIG gloves are thicker and make it difficult if not impossible to pick up small or thin objects, but allow for a second hand to offer precise positioning and stability of the MIG torch even when it’s right up next to a fresh weld.

• Proper clothing. Whether it’s made of leather or a non-synthetic flame-resistant material, a jacket will keep your arms and upper body safe from burns, and a hat or other head covering will stop an errant spark from landing on your scalp or neck. A bandana or backwards cotton baseball cap is all it takes.

• Hearing and face protection. Safety glasses, a face shield, and ear muffs/plugs are necessities. The welding process is only about as loud as frying breakfast, but the cutting and grinding used to prepare materials is intense. A set of ear plugs or muffs will preserve your hearing, while safety glasses and a face shield protect from flying debris when grinding, especially if a grinding disc brakes.

A MIG welder is a very versatile tool for the car lover. They can be used to replace rusty sheet metal, fabricate brackets, remove stuck fasteners, and the more powerful versions can even tackle frame repair. When first starting MIG welding there are absolute necessities and there are tools that make the job much more comfortable and speed up things up. Here are our favorite must-have tools and accessories that we can’t live without:

• Gloves. Welding involves intense heat. It’s melting steel after all. TIG gloves are thinner and allow for more dexterity, but offer less insulation. MIG gloves are thicker and make it difficult if not impossible to pick up small or thin objects, but allow for a second hand to offer precise positioning and stability of the MIG torch even when it’s right up next to a fresh weld.

• Proper clothing. Whether it’s made of leather or a non-synthetic flame-resistant material, a jacket will keep your arms and upper body safe from burns, and a hat or other head covering will stop an errant spark from landing on your scalp or neck. A bandana or backwards cotton baseball cap is all it takes.

• Hearing and face protection. Safety glasses, a face shield, and ear muffs/plugs are necessities. The welding process is only about as loud as frying breakfast, but the cutting and grinding used to prepare materials is intense. A set of ear plugs or muffs will preserve your hearing, while safety glasses and a face shield protect from flying debris when grinding, especially if a grinding disc brakes.