1965 289 C-code horsepower gains – mustangforums.com gas news uk

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Brand new to this forum..recently purchased a 1965 Mustang conv., it has the original 289 C-code 2V which (from what im reading) originally put out 200hp at the flywheel. It drives decent as-is (idle is a little rough), but want to get some more horsepower out of it. I have SOME mechanical knowledge but am by no means an expert. I was considering the following upgrades and wanted to see how much more horsepower I can expect?

PatIf things are original, the car has the smaller 8-inch Ford rear axle. It is borderline good for minor hop-ups, inadequate for even 270 HP, which the High-Performance 289 delivered; those ’65s got a factory installed 9-inch rear, bulletproof. electricity and circuits class 6 questions That’s my first thought. After that, since you don’t mention eng. condition or mileage (if known), I would perform a compression check to determine cylinder and piston rings condition. If satisfactory, I suggest that a 4-bbl carb. would give you little added gain, unless you replaced the camshaft with a more aggressive grind. It is likely the old cam and lifters are probably pretty well worn if they have not been changed. A higher-duration cam would work well with the carb upgrade.

The rough idle could very well be due to valves, which a compression check should show up. New heads would solve a whole lot of possible weaknesses there. You can check for a burnt exhaust valve very easily. Get a paper matchbook, spread it open and closed so the flap swings nice and easy, and bring the flap up against the end of the exhaust tailpipe with the engine idling. If the flap is alternately sucked up against the end of the pipe repeatedly, there is drawback of exhaust gas present, usually due to a burnt valve(s).

If things are original, the car has the smaller 8-inch Ford rear axle. It is borderline good for minor hop-ups, inadequate for even 270 HP, which the High-Performance 289 delivered; those ’65s got a factory installed 9-inch rear, bulletproof. That’s my first thought. After that, since you don’t mention eng. condition or mileage (if known), I would perform a compression check to determine cylinder and piston rings condition. If satisfactory, I suggest that a 4-bbl carb. would give you little added gain, unless you replaced the camshaft with a more aggressive grind. a gas is a form of matter that It is likely the old cam and lifters are probably pretty well worn if they have not been changed. A higher-duration cam would work well with the carb upgrade.

The rough idle could very well be due to valves, which a compression check should show up. New heads would solve a whole lot of possible weaknesses there. electricity receiver You can check for a burnt exhaust valve very easily. Get a paper matchbook, spread it open and closed so the flap swings nice and easy, and bring the flap up against the end of the exhaust tailpipe with the engine idling. If the flap is alternately sucked up against the end of the pipe repeatedly, there is drawback of exhaust gas present, usually due to a burnt valve(s).

I’m not sure on the mileage of the car (odometer reads 35k but I’m sure it’s rolled over). Engine seems to run strong…I think I misspoke when I said "rough" idle…it idles well once warmed up. The butterfly valve on the carb seems to stay closed for too long…when I prop it open with a screwdriver until it warms up enough to open up on its own it idles fine.

The "butterfly" you speak of is the choke plate. It’s closed position is determined by a spring. The black plastic cap on the RH side of the carb. body has 3 screws which lock it in place. Loosening those screws allows the black cap to be rotated one way or the other, increasing closing force on the choke plate, or decreasing it. There should be a line scribed on edge of the cap, and another, possibly a series of lines, on the carb. The line on the cap moves when it is rotated, and the fixed lines are used to tell you how far the cap has been moved, and where it is BEFORE LOOSENING it’s 3 screws.

Inside the cap is a wound thermostatic spring which twists as it gets heated up. That twisting gradually opens up the choke plate (without your screwdriver!). A tube, usually covered with insulating material comes up from the exhaust manifold on the RH (passenger) side, and is fastened to the underside of the choke housing, below the black cap. Vacuum draws hot air through the tube from the manifold to heat the choke spring. Some of these parts may be missing. Under the rim of the black cap is a gasket. If it’s missing, air will leak there and diminish the hot air flow through the tube. In Maryland, you most definitely want a functioning choke. There may be few old guys left who remember exactly how to work with "Automatic Chokes". gas x strips ingredients Black smoke means unburned gasoline which is harmful to cylinder walls, as it thins the oil. Trick is to adjust that cap so that the choke plate closes shut completely (when throttle is slightly opened) when the engine is quite cold. Upon starting, the plate should pull open part way by itself (due to vacuum) and the engine should run at a fast idle to keep it from stalling. That fast idle is adjusted by a screw located between the choke body and the carb body, where a stepped-tang fastened to the carb throttle plate end catches on the screw end, holding the throttle open ever so slightly. Too much choke causes what you have: smoke, stalling at idle. gas vs electric water heater cost per year Too little choke will allow the engine to die right after starting. Idea is to find the happy medium.

The "butterfly" you speak of is the choke plate. It’s closed position is determined by a spring. The black plastic cap on the RH side of the carb. body has 3 screws which lock it in place. Loosening those screws allows the black cap to be rotated one way or the other, increasing closing force on the choke plate, or decreasing it. There should be a line scribed on edge of the cap, and another, possibly a series of lines, on the carb. The line on the cap moves when it is rotated, and the fixed lines are used to tell you how far the cap has been moved, and where it is BEFORE LOOSENING it’s 3 screws.

Inside the cap is a wound thermostatic spring which twists as it gets heated up. That twisting gradually opens up the choke plate (without your screwdriver!). A tube, usually covered with insulating material comes up from the exhaust manifold on the RH (passenger) side, and is fastened to the underside of the choke housing, below the black cap. Vacuum draws hot air through the tube from the manifold to heat the choke spring. Some of these parts may be missing. Under the rim of the black cap is a gasket. electricity kwh to unit converter If it’s missing, air will leak there and diminish the hot air flow through the tube. In Maryland, you most definitely want a functioning choke. There may be few old guys left who remember exactly how to work with "Automatic Chokes". Black smoke means unburned gasoline which is harmful to cylinder walls, as it thins the oil. Trick is to adjust that cap so that the choke plate closes shut completely (when throttle is slightly opened) when the engine is quite cold. Upon starting, the plate should pull open part way by itself (due to vacuum) and the engine should run at a fast idle to keep it from stalling. That fast idle is adjusted by a screw located between the choke body and the carb body, where a stepped-tang fastened to the carb throttle plate end catches on the screw end, holding the throttle open ever so slightly. Too much choke causes what you have: smoke, stalling at idle. Too little choke will allow the engine to die right after starting. Idea is to find the happy medium.