2 Amp electromagnetic chaser electricity word search j farkas answers

I am trying to make a series of electromagnets that cycle like an LED chaser. I am going to use it on a maglev model train. I am going to make a test track ten magnets long to make sure my concept will work and then I am going to make a track ~ 300 electromagnets long. I was thinking I would do this by taking an LED chaser circuit and replacing the LED with a NPN transistor like these https://www.adafruit.com/product/976?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIrbDKjp-L2gIVEJN-Ch3FUQ_-EAQYAyABEgIA8PD_BwE and wiring the electromagnets with that. I was going to use this power source https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01M3372K…olid=1BCVNFYS0SCVN&psc=0&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it for the train and wire it so that the chaser circuit is wired low amps by placing a resistor before it. The collector on the transistor would be wired in parallel to the chaser so the chaser would have low eneough amps running through it but the electromagnets would have all two amps. Will this work or is there an easier way? Any help is appreciated. The goal is to have one circuit that will work at a length of around 10 but that can be extended to ~300 long effectively.

I am trying to make a series of electromagnets that cycle like an LED chaser. I am going to use it on a maglev model train. I am going to make a test track ten magnets long to make sure my concept will work and then I am going to make a track ~ 300 electromagnets long. I was thinking I would do this by taking an LED chaser circuit and replacing the LED with a NPN transistor like these https://www.adafruit.com/product/976?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIrbDKjp-L2gIVEJN-Ch3FUQ_-EAQYAyABEgIA8PD_BwE and wiring the electromagnets with that. I was going to use this power source https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01M3372K…olid=1BCVNFYS0SCVN&psc=0&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it for the train and wire it so that the chaser circuit is wired low amps by placing a resistor before it. The collector on the transistor would be wired in parallel to the chaser so the chaser would have low eneough amps running through it but the electromagnets would have all two amps. Will this work or is there an easier way? Any help is appreciated. The goal is to have one circuit that will work at a length of around 10 but that can be extended to ~300 long effectively.

You have the MOSFETs connected as source-followers (a parallel to an emitter follower). With a much higher battery voltage this might work, but in you case the MOSFET threshold voltage decreases the voltage available across the solenoid coils. The available voltage would actually be larger if you stuck with the TIP120, but there still might not be enough voltage to insure reliable operation.

As above, the "right" way is to connect all of the MOSFET sources to GND, all of the drains to solenoids, and all of the solenoids other ends to Vbat. In this way the transistor can act as a saturated switch with a much lower voltage drop across it.

Also, you *must* add a suppression diode across each solenoid. A MOSFET can turn off very quickly, and the resulting magnetic field collapse will generate a voltage spike across the solenoid coil that can reach hundreds of volts. This is the same principle that helps turn 12 V into 20 kV across a spark plug. A power MOSFET has an intrinsic zener diode internally; don’t rely on it.

A cleaner way to draw a schematic is to let non-connecting traces cross with straight lines, and use connection dots for connections. Never have two crossing traces that are supposed to connect form a 4-point connection. Stagger one of the traces so there are two adjacent 3-point T connections with dots. This is unambiguous and will survive photocopying, scanning, faxing, etc.

A schematic is not an assembly drawing; its primary function is to show signal relationships, not physical ones. It almost always is better for the information flow in a schematic if you do not use a component’s actual pinout as its decal. Feel free to rearrange the pin locations to improve clarity. Signals flow from left to right; power from top to bottom. For example, put the 555 timing pins on the left and output on the right; 4017 clock and control pins on the left, and all outputs on the right (0 on the bottom, 9 on the top). In this way, the signal flow is from left to right through each component and across the sheet. Also, you can eliminate a lot of crossing lines if you use Vcc and GND symbols.