2004 Tacoma recall tacoma world electricity schoolhouse rock

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The dealer billed Toyota $12,986. They let me look at the paperwork but didn’t let me keep a copy. When I dropped it off I was told 5 to 8 months to get a frame in. It arrived in 4 weeks. The dealer was as surprised as I was. Nobody seems to have any idea how the new frames are allocated to dealers (including, apparently, dealers). If you are going to get parts for the dealer to install during the switch, get them lined up now. You might not have time later if the frame shows up quickly. The actual work took 3 days.

Nobody knows what exactly is included in the new frame "kit." Some get brake lines, some don’t. Some get e-brake cables, some don’t. Some people were allowed in the shop to photograph the process, some were not. Some folks here have had dealers do all additional work for free, and some have had to pay for all additional work. Under the 2nd Gen class-action agreement everything is strictly spelled out. With your 1st Gen ’04, there are guidelines that cover a few things such as major parts and the loaner vehicle policy, but almost everything else is open to negotiation. People’s experiences, as reported on this site and elsewhere, have varied wildly. Be proactive.

I had a shitload of extra stuff done during my frame job, and I made the service guy sit down and go over each thing and agree on labor charges. Anything that comes completely off, whether re-installed or replaced, should have no labor charge (shocks, rear bumper, skid plates, etc.). Reduced labor for things opened up for access during the swap (I had the charcoal canister on top of the gas tank done for half-labor while it was more easily accessible). I paid full labor for the front bumper, since it wouldn’t have been touched otherwise. I looked up all the prices for the parts beforehand and what they quoted me was right – no extra mark-up. Try to spend some time with your Service Rep. and find out what they’ll do for you. You probably won’t get everything you want, but you might get more than you thought.

Also, be aware of the current condition of everything else under the truck. When the frame comes in and they take the truck apart, they’ll call and tell you you need new skid plates, shocks, squirrel defibrillator, etc. It’s easier (and cheaper) for them to torch out the old and put in new parts than to carefully remove and re-install the old parts (plus the profit on the new parts is a nice bonus for them). You don’t want to buy anything you don’t really need. On the other hand, if you do want to replace some of that stuff, doing it now with the free or reduced labor makes sense. Or see if they will install aftermarket stuff if you buy your own parts elsewhere. Many people have reported they were allowed to do this.

Some people have reported that they needed to bring the truck back in after the swap to have things tightened or adjusted. A couple people reported bent or mis-manufactured replacement frames. Mine had no issues at all, and with the super detail job they did as part of the frame swap, it was like new.

The dealer billed Toyota $12,986. They let me look at the paperwork but didn’t let me keep a copy. When I dropped it off I was told 5 to 8 months to get a frame in. It arrived in 4 weeks. The dealer was as surprised as I was. Nobody seems to have any idea how the new frames are allocated to dealers (including, apparently, dealers). If you are going to get parts for the dealer to install during the switch, get them lined up now. You might not have time later if the frame shows up quickly. The actual work took 3 days.

Nobody knows what exactly is included in the new frame "kit." Some get brake lines, some don’t. Some get e-brake cables, some don’t. Some people were allowed in the shop to photograph the process, some were not. Some folks here have had dealers do all additional work for free, and some have had to pay for all additional work. Under the 2nd Gen class-action agreement everything is strictly spelled out. With your 1st Gen ’04, there are guidelines that cover a few things such as major parts and the loaner vehicle policy, but almost everything else is open to negotiation. People’s experiences, as reported on this site and elsewhere, have varied wildly. Be proactive.

I had a shitload of extra stuff done during my frame job, and I made the service guy sit down and go over each thing and agree on labor charges. Anything that comes completely off, whether re-installed or replaced, should have no labor charge (shocks, rear bumper, skid plates, etc.). Reduced labor for things opened up for access during the swap (I had the charcoal canister on top of the gas tank done for half-labor while it was more easily accessible). I paid full labor for the front bumper, since it wouldn’t have been touched otherwise. I looked up all the prices for the parts beforehand and what they quoted me was right – no extra mark-up. Try to spend some time with your Service Rep. and find out what they’ll do for you. You probably won’t get everything you want, but you might get more than you thought.

Also, be aware of the current condition of everything else under the truck. When the frame comes in and they take the truck apart, they’ll call and tell you you need new skid plates, shocks, squirrel defibrillator, etc. It’s easier (and cheaper) for them to torch out the old and put in new parts than to carefully remove and re-install the old parts (plus the profit on the new parts is a nice bonus for them). You don’t want to buy anything you don’t really need. On the other hand, if you do want to replace some of that stuff, doing it now with the free or reduced labor makes sense. Or see if they will install aftermarket stuff if you buy your own parts elsewhere. Many people have reported they were allowed to do this.

Some people have reported that they needed to bring the truck back in after the swap to have things tightened or adjusted. A couple people reported bent or mis-manufactured replacement frames. Mine had no issues at all, and with the super detail job they did as part of the frame swap, it was like new.