2017 Ten who made a difference featured gillettenewsrecord.com electricity and magnetism study guide 5th grade

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Like most people who find themselves as the caregivers for their parents or spouses later in life, Roosa is quick to admit that neither he nor his wife, Barb, were ready for the task. He said they had to “learn on the fly” the ins and outs of how to deal with an adult affected by a progressive form of dementia.

In the end, his mother was living at Pioneer Manor and Roosa, a board member of the facility, started holding some support group meetings with family and caregivers of some of the residents there. He eventually decided that everyone should have access to that type of peer support and help.

Janet Kobielusz also facilitates the group with Roosa, and is a caregiver herself. Her husband, John, has Alzheimer’s. She said that Roosa, a retired school teacher, has a gift for not only reaching people on an intellectual basis, but an emotional one as well.

Before Roosa started gathering caregivers to meet here, there was no place for those in that situation to find support locally, Kobielusz said. In fact, when she first started looking for a group, she had to go to Cheyenne to attend a meeting.

Roosa said he never sought recognition for his efforts, only to know that it’s helping others to navigate their situations better than he could when he had to. He also said he’s been a fan of the 10 Who Made a Difference winners over the years.

Strohschein, a dentist at Pronghorn Family Dentistry, didn’t start out in dentistry. The Campbell County High School graduate was set to graduate with a degree in food service management. Then during Christmas one year in college, she decided on a whim to apply to dental school.

Despite not making the deadlines for any of the applications, the dean at the University of Nebraska gave Strohschein a chance. When she graduated from dental school in 1994, she didn’t have any “real” job opportunities or options, she said.

Four years ago, after noticing a flaw in the government-assisted insurance policy program for patients, Strohschein and her staff brainstormed and came up with their own community indigent funds account. It allows patients to have affordable dental care that otherwise wouldn’t.

That’s not the case for Strohschein’s patients from the Adult Treatment Court. Providing care for toothaches, fillings, wisdom teeth pulling, abscess, general cleanings and more for people who otherwise couldn’t afford it has left some patients struggling to find words to show their appreciation.

“They’re unbelievably appreciative,” Strohschein said. “I’ve had some of them just beg, you know, ‘What can I do in return?’ I’ve had some that have swept the parking lot (at the office). I’ve had some shovel snow for me. One guy still insists on bringing us flowers on a random basis because somebody believed in them beyond drug court. We were able to help them and they show their appreciation back.”

Like most people who find themselves as the caregivers for their parents or spouses later in life, Roosa is quick to admit that neither he nor his wife, Barb, were ready for the task. He said they had to “learn on the fly” the ins and outs of how to deal with an adult affected by a progressive form of dementia.

In the end, his mother was living at Pioneer Manor and Roosa, a board member of the facility, started holding some support group meetings with family and caregivers of some of the residents there. He eventually decided that everyone should have access to that type of peer support and help.

Janet Kobielusz also facilitates the group with Roosa, and is a caregiver herself. Her husband, John, has Alzheimer’s. She said that Roosa, a retired school teacher, has a gift for not only reaching people on an intellectual basis, but an emotional one as well.

Before Roosa started gathering caregivers to meet here, there was no place for those in that situation to find support locally, Kobielusz said. In fact, when she first started looking for a group, she had to go to Cheyenne to attend a meeting.

Roosa said he never sought recognition for his efforts, only to know that it’s helping others to navigate their situations better than he could when he had to. He also said he’s been a fan of the 10 Who Made a Difference winners over the years.

Strohschein, a dentist at Pronghorn Family Dentistry, didn’t start out in dentistry. The Campbell County High School graduate was set to graduate with a degree in food service management. Then during Christmas one year in college, she decided on a whim to apply to dental school.

Despite not making the deadlines for any of the applications, the dean at the University of Nebraska gave Strohschein a chance. When she graduated from dental school in 1994, she didn’t have any “real” job opportunities or options, she said.

Four years ago, after noticing a flaw in the government-assisted insurance policy program for patients, Strohschein and her staff brainstormed and came up with their own community indigent funds account. It allows patients to have affordable dental care that otherwise wouldn’t.

That’s not the case for Strohschein’s patients from the Adult Treatment Court. Providing care for toothaches, fillings, wisdom teeth pulling, abscess, general cleanings and more for people who otherwise couldn’t afford it has left some patients struggling to find words to show their appreciation.

“They’re unbelievably appreciative,” Strohschein said. “I’ve had some of them just beg, you know, ‘What can I do in return?’ I’ve had some that have swept the parking lot (at the office). I’ve had some shovel snow for me. One guy still insists on bringing us flowers on a random basis because somebody believed in them beyond drug court. We were able to help them and they show their appreciation back.”