2018 In the united kingdom – wikipedia la gas prices

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• 3 January – The NHS in England cancels all non-urgent treatments from mid-January until the end of the month, as reports emerge of patients facing long waits for treatment and being stuck on trolleys in corridors and of ambulances left queuing outside A&E. [5]

• US President Donald Trump scraps a planned visit to the UK, blaming his predecessor, Barack Obama, for a "bad deal" on the new embassy due to be opened in London, despite the fact it was agreed under the administration of George W Bush. [11]

• Three teenage boys on their way to a sixteenth birthday party are killed when a car mounts a pavement in Hayes, West London. Police arrest a 28-year-old man on suspicion of causing death by dangerous driving. [27] A second, 34-year-old man, who fled the scene, later hands himself in to police. [28]

• 20 February – Brexit secretary David Davis states that Britain will not be "plunged into a Mad Max-style world borrowed from dystopian fiction" after it leaves the EU and suggests a Brexit deal by the end of 2018 is "well on the cards". [43]

• 27 February – 4 March – Heavy snow causes disruption across much of the UK. [53] Over subsequent days the Met Office issues the first ever red snow warning for Scotland, [54] South-West England and South Wales, meaning the weather poses a potential risk to life. [55] With ten severe weather warnings in place, the Army is called in to help rescue hundreds of stranded motorists. [56] Several people are reported to have died in circumstances related to the freezing conditions. [57] As temperatures later begin rising and ice thaws, the Environment Agency issues weather warnings due to flooding, mainly in the South-West and North-East England. [58]

• 4 March – Former Russian double agent Sergei Skripal and daughter Yulia are poisoned with a publicly unidentified nerve agent in Salisbury. [65] They are brought to hospital in critical condition, along with a police officer who was first on the scene. Counter-terrorism police investigate amid speculation the Kremlin was behind the incident. [66]

• 6 March – Ex-UKIP leader Henry Bolton announces he will create a new political party called "OneNation" that would "campaign unceasingly for our full independence from the EU", and "mirror some of the changes that I sought to bring to UKIP". [70]

• The EU rejects Theresa May’s proposal for "mutual recognition" of standards between the UK and EU as part of a post-Brexit trade relationship, while also ruling out British membership of EU regulators such as the European Medicines Agency after Brexit. [73]

• The government calls for an urgent meeting of the UN Security Council to discuss the poisoning of Sergei Skripal and Yulia Skripal on 4 March. Theresa May announces that 23 Russian diplomats will be expelled from the UK after Russia fails to respond to claims of involvement. [84]

• Following the events of 4 March, Theresa May visits Salisbury. In a joint statement, the leaders of the UK, US, France and Germany say the ex-spy poisoning was the first offensive use of a nerve agent in Europe since the Second World War, and that Russian involvement is the "only plausible explanation". [85]

• 17–19 March – Heavy snow affects much of the UK. It is dubbed the "mini beast from the east"; a sequel to the previous cold wave at the start of the month. On 17 March, amber weather warnings are issued for North-West England, Yorkshire, the Midlands, London and South-East England. [87] On 18 March, they are issued for South-West England, South-East England, mid-Wales and the West Midlands. [88] Dozens of vehicles were stuck overnight on the A30 in Devon whilst two weather warnings remained still in place for much of the UK after wintry showers disrupted many parts of Britain. [89]

• 18–19 March – Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson dismisses claims from Russian EU ambassador, Vladimir Chizhov, who said that Porton Down may have been the source of the nerve agent. It is reported that experts from the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons will arrive on 19 March to test samples of the substance. [91]

• Channel 4 airs a documentary about Cambridge Analytica, the data analysis company that worked on the successful Leave.EU campaign advocating British withdrawal from the EU, and for Donald Trump‘s 2016 presidential campaign. Undercover reporters, talking to executives from the firm, discover the use of bribes, honey traps, fake news campaigns and operations with ex-spies to swing election campaigns around the world. [96] An emergency court order is requested to raid the Cambridge Analytica offices. [97]

• The High Court overturns the Parole Board’s decision to grant parole to convicted rapist John Worboys after two of his victims launched a legal challenge. The decision comes as the chair of the Board, Nick Hardwick, tenders his resignation. [112]

• Thousands, including several celebrities, turn up to pay their final respects to the late comedian, Sir Ken Dodd at his funeral at Liverpool Cathedral. Dodd died on 11 March at his lifelong home in Knotty Ash at the age of 90, following a chest infection. [114]

• The National Living Wage for people over 25 increases from £7.50 to £7.83 an hour. Workers between the ages of 21–24 receive an hourly pay rise from £7.05 to £7.38, wages rise from £5.60 to £5.90 for 18–20 year olds, from £4.05 to £4.20 for 16–17 year olds and from £3.50 to £3.70 for apprentices aged under 19 or in the first year of their apprenticeship. [120]

• 4 April – A 78-year-old man is arrested on suspicion of murder after a suspected burglar, armed with a screwdriver, forced the man into his kitchen where a struggle ensued and the burglar was stabbed to death. [123] He is later released without charge. [124]

• Theresa May suffers two defeats in the House of Lords on her flagship Brexit legislation. In the first, the Lords vote by 348 to 225 to force a negotiation of a Customs Union between the EU and the UK. In the second, the Lords vote by 314 to 217 on an amendment limiting the ability of ministers to use secondary legislation to water down existing EU rights when those rights get transferred to UK law. [135]

• Theresa May announces a national day of commemoration for murdered teenager Stephen Lawrence, which will take place on 22 April every year. Eighteen-year-old Lawrence was stabbed to death on 22 April 1993, whilst waiting for a bus in Eltham. [145]

• Elections to many local councils and mayoralties are held in England, including all 32 London boroughs. There are losses for the Conservatives (−33) and gains for Labour (+77), the Lib Dems (+75) and Green Party (+8). Meanwhile, UKIP are nearly wiped out, losing 123 councillors and retaining just three. Other parties see a net loss of four councillors. [156]

• 8 May – Three votes take place in the House of Lords on the issue of Brexit. In the first, peers vote to remove the exit date of 29 March 2019 from the withdrawal bill, in order to give more time for negotiations. In the second, they vote to retain UK membership of EU agencies such as Euratom. In the third, they vote to give MPs a chance to vote on remaining in the European Economic Area, which would enable the UK to access the single market. [162]