2019 Hyundai kona electric – even a frigid winter can’t stop this battery crossover gas in oil causes

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When people think of leaders in the electric vehicle sector, brands like Tesla, Nissan and maybe even GM come to mind. Hyundai Motor Group on the other hand probably does not and that’s a shame. While HMG which consists of the Hyundai, Kia and Genesis brands is far from the leader in EV sales volume so far, they actually have more plug-in models available than any other automaker. The list includes the Optima PHEV, Niro PHEV and EV and Soul EV from Kia along with the Sonata PHEV, Ioniq PHEV, Ioniq EV and now the Kona EV which I just spent a week with.

Since its debut in gas-engined form last summer, the Kona has quickly gained popularity in the Hyundai lineup. The Kona’s compact footprint make it a great choice as an urban commuter vehicle and with the available turbocharged 1.6-liter four-cylinder it’s actually a lot of fun to drive. Swapping out gas news today the internal combustion powertrain for a 64-kWh lithium ion battery pack and a 201-hp electric motor adds about 700-pounds to the curb weight and yet does little to do diminish the Kona’s basic nature thanks to the low slung mass of the battery and instant torque of the motor.

Seemingly one sure-fire way to keep electricity jeopardy game American consumers from buying your products these days is to call whatever you’re selling a car. That’s why Chevrolet insists on calling the Bolt a crossover despite the fact that it is very clearly a compact hatchback car. The Kona at least kind of, sort of looks like a crossover, but like most small utilities this is basically a tall hatchback as well. It’s roofline is even 1.6-inches lower than the Bolt. Frankly I don’t have a problem with these things being cars. Let the marketers call them what they will.

The 290 lb-ft of instant torque available from Hyundai’s motor is 30 more than what the Chevy offers and despite carrying about 200 pounds more mass, the Kona is slightly quicker and feels that way off the line. Both cars handle surprisingly well given the low rolling resistance tires they use, but the Hyundai feels like its limits are a bit higher before terminal understeer sets in. Despite being artificial, the weighting of the steering in the Kona feels good and still provides some decent feedback.

Even in Eco mode, the Kona has all of the classic off the line electric thrust that feels so good, but switching to sport mode makes the accelerator even more responsive. Hyundai takes a slightly different approach to one pedal driving than Chevrolet or Nissan. The steering wheel paddles allow the driver to dial in how much regen they want from 1 to 3, but even at 3, the car electricity physics definition doesn’t come to a complete stop without touching the brake. However, holding the left paddle actually will bring the car to a full stop. I prefer to just modulate the accelerator but this is close enough.

The most important features all come in the base SE model, with the upper trims adding extras like a sunroof, leather, the wireless charger and other chapter 7 electricity non-essentials. Pricing ranges from $37,500 to 45,500 for the Ultimate. Unlike Tesla and soon GM, Hyundai is still a ways off from phasing out its federal tax credit eligibility so the Kona gets the full $7,500 tax break for now. Because of supply constraints on the batteries, Hyundai is only offering the Kona Electric in California and about a dozen other states right now (the same goes for other plug-in Hyundai and Kia models).

The Kona Electric is a fun little EV and my week with it demonstrated that even in frigid weather, having over 200 miles of driving range really is the sweet spot for all but the longest commutes. The back seat is snug, but if you need more usable space back there, the Kia Niro EV uses the same powertrain and battery but offers an extra 4-inches of length for the same price. With all of these new entries, Hyundai Motor Group is definitely positioning itself as a serious player in the EV space. It’s good to have choices in EVs as they inch toward becoming more affordable, especially when the current most popular model comes from a manufacturer that may be veering toward insolvency.

When people think of leaders in the electric vehicle sector, brands like Tesla, Nissan and maybe even GM come to mind. Hyundai Motor Group on the other hand probably does not and that’s a shame. While HMG which consists of the Hyundai, Kia and Genesis brands is far from the leader in EV sales volume so far, they actually have more plug-in models available than any other automaker. The list electricity icons free includes the Optima PHEV, Niro PHEV and EV and Soul EV from Kia along with the Sonata PHEV, Ioniq PHEV, Ioniq EV and now the Kona EV which I just spent a week with.

Since its debut in gas-engined form last summer, the Kona gas jet compressor has quickly gained popularity in the Hyundai lineup. The Kona’s compact footprint make it a great choice as an urban commuter vehicle and with the available turbocharged 1.6-liter four-cylinder it’s actually a lot of fun to drive. Swapping out the internal combustion powertrain for a 64-kWh lithium ion battery pack and a 201-hp electric motor adds about 700-pounds to the curb weight and yet does little to do diminish the Kona’s basic nature thanks to the low slung mass of the battery and instant torque of the motor.

Seemingly one sure-fire way to keep American consumers from buying your products these days is to call whatever you’re selling a car. That’s why Chevrolet insists on calling the Bolt a crossover despite the fact that it is very clearly a compact hatchback car. The Kona at least kind of, sort of looks like a crossover, but like most small utilities this is basically a tall hatchback as well. It’s roofline is even 1.6-inches lower than the Bolt. Frankly I don’t have a problem with these things being cars. Let the marketers call them what they will.

The 290 lb-ft of instant torque available from Hyundai’s motor is 30 more than what the Chevy offers and despite carrying about 200 pounds more mass, the Kona is slightly quicker and feels that way off the line. Both cars handle surprisingly well given the low rolling resistance tires they use, but the Hyundai feels like its limits are a bit higher before terminal understeer sets in. Despite gas under 3 dollars being artificial, the weighting of the steering in the Kona feels good and still provides some decent feedback.

Even in Eco mode, the Kona has all of the classic off the line electric thrust that feels so good, but switching to sport mode makes the accelerator even more responsive. Hyundai takes a slightly different approach to one pedal driving than Chevrolet or Nissan. The steering wheel paddles allow the driver to dial in how much regen they want from 1 to 3, but even at 3, the car doesn’t come to a complete stop without touching the brake. However, holding the left paddle actually will bring the car to a full stop. I prefer to just modulate the accelerator but this is close enough.

The most important features all come in the base SE model, with the upper trims electricity bill cost adding extras like a sunroof, leather, the wireless charger and other non-essentials. Pricing ranges from $37,500 to 45,500 for the Ultimate. Unlike Tesla and soon GM, Hyundai is still a ways off from phasing out its federal tax credit eligibility so the Kona gets the full $7,500 tax break for now. Because of supply constraints on the batteries, Hyundai is only offering the Kona Electric in California and about a dozen other states right now (the same goes for other plug-in Hyundai and Kia models).

The Kona Electric is a fun little EV and my week with it demonstrated that even in frigid weather, having over 200 miles of driving range really is the sweet spot for all but the longest commutes. The back seat is snug, but if you need more usable space back there, the Kia Niro EV uses the same powertrain and battery but offers an extra 4-inches of length for the same price. With all of these new entries, Hyundai Motor Group gas bloating nausea is definitely positioning itself as a serious player in the EV space. It’s good to have choices in EVs as they inch toward becoming more affordable, especially when the current most popular model comes from a manufacturer that may be veering toward insolvency.