3-Digit subtraction worksheets (some regrouping) la gasolina letra

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If most of your students provided the correct answers for at least half of the problems on the previous worksheet, use this printable to review three-digit subtraction with regrouping as a class. If the students struggled with the previous worksheet, first review two-digit subtraction with regrouping. Before handing out this worksheet, show students how to do at least one of problems.

For example, problem No. 1 is 682 – 426. Explain to students that you cannot take 6—called the subtrahend, the bottom number in a subtraction problem, from 2—the minuend or top number. As a result, you have to borrow from the 8, leaving 7 as the minuend in the tens column. Tell students they will carry the 1 they borrowed and place it next to the 2 in the ones column—so they now have 12 as the minuend in the ones column. Tell the students that 12 – 6 = 6, which is the number they would place below the horizontal line in the ones column. In the tens column, they now have 7 – 2, which equals 5. In the hundreds column, explain that 6 – 4 = 2, so the answer to the problem would be 256.

If students are struggling, let them use manipulatives—physical items such as gummy bears, poker chips, or small cookies—to help them work out these problems. For example, problem No. 2 in this PDF is 735 – 552. Use pennies as your manipulatives. Have students count five pennies, representing the minuend in the ones column.

Ask them to take away two pennies, representing the subtrahend in the ones column. This will yield three, so have students write 3 at the bottom of the ones column. Now have them count out three pennies, representing the minuend in the tens column. Ask them to take away five pennies. Hopefully, they will tell you they cannot. Tell them that they will need to borrow from the 7, the minuend in the hundreds column, making it 6.

They will then carry the 1 to the tens column and insert it before the 3, making that top number 13. Explain that 13 minus 5 equals 8. Have students write 8 at the bottom of the tens column. Lastly, they will subtract 5 from 6, yielding 1 as the answer in the tens column, giving a final answer to the problem of 183.

Use this worksheet to demonstrate how to use base 10 blocks. For example, problem No. 1 is 294 – 158. Use green cubes for ones, blue bars (which contain 10 blocks) for 10s, and a 100 flat for the hundreds place. Have students count out four green cubes, representing the minuend in the ones column.

Ask them if they can take eight blocks from four. When they say no, have them count out nine blue (10-block) bars, representing the minuend in the tens column. Tell them to borrow one blue bar from the tens column and carry it over to the ones column. Have them place the blue bar in front of the four green cubes, and then have them count the total cubes in the blue bar and the green cubes; they should get 14, which when you subtract eight, yields six.

Have them place the 6 at the bottom of the ones column. They now have eight blue bars in the tens column; have the students take away five to yield the number 3. Have them write 3 at the bottom of the tens column. The hundreds column is easy: 2 – 1 = 1, yielding an answer for the problem of 136.