5 Foods to avoid with hypothyroidism whole new mom electricity terms and definitions

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Your doctor probably won’t tell you about this, but knowing how the foods you put in your body impact your thyroid function is just as important as getting the right tests and getting on the proper dosage of thyroid medication. Diet and Disease

Think about it–does it make sense to put junk into your body and expect it to work well? Just like you wouldn’t put sludge into your car’s gas tank, you shouldn’t be putting processed foods, pesticides, artificial colors, and more into your body.

Actually, that’s not the case. Even though on the surface, they might appear to be healthy, they might not be for you. In fact, there are several foods to avoid with hypothyroidism, or at least foods that you might want to take a closer look at if you struggle with thyroid disease. This post contains affiliate links from which I will earn a commission. 5 Foods to Avoid with Hypothyroidism 1. Soy

The problematic compound in soy (for your thyroid) are the isoflavones. In fact, a study in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism reported that researchers fed some subjects 16 mg of soy isoflavones, which is the amount found in the typical vegetarian’s diet, and others 2 mg soy isoflavones, which is the amount found in most omnivore’s diets.

Infants fed soy formula are at higher risk for hypothyroidism and for later development of autoimmune thyroid diseases. In humans, goiter has been detected in infants fed soy formula; this is usually reversed by changing to cow milk or iodine-supplemented diets . After the 1960s, manufacturers reportedly began adding iodine to formulas to mitigate thyroid effects.” ( Doerge, 2002)

One of the most controversial on the list of foods to avoid with hypothyroidism is this one. Broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, kale, brussels sprouts, radishes, turnips, collard greens… and the list goes on (You can find the complete list of cruciferous vegetables here).

“The effects of fluoride on various aspects of endocrine function should be examined, particularly with respect to a possible role in the development of several diseases or mental states in the United States. Major areas of investigation include . . . thyroid disease (especially in light of decreasing iodine intake by the U.S. population).” ( National Research Council, 2006)

• Don’t forget to check your medications. You might be surprised to learn that many common medications are fluorinated. Antidepressants, antacids, arthritis medications, and more contain fluoride. Be sure to check this site to find out if the medication you’re taking is on the list.

Your thyroid produces a hormone called triiodothyronine, known as T3. It also produces a hormone called thyroxine, known as T4. Together, these hormones regulate your body’s temperature, metabolism, and heart rate. Most of the T3 in your body binds to protein.

Trisha Gilkerson is a homeschooling mom to four crazy boys. She blogs with her awesome hubby Luke at Intoxicated on Life where they talk about faith, homeschooling, and health. They’ve authored the Write Through the Bible curriculum and family Bible Studies and have recently released their first healthy living book – Weeding Out Wheat: A Simple Faith Based Guide. They love connecting with their readers, so be sure to follow them on their blog, Facebook, Twitter, Google+, and Pinterest.