5 Recommendations to improve retail cybersecurity this holiday season 2015 electricity increase

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With the holiday season upon us, retailers have an opportunity to boost revenues before the end of the year. Any increase in profit at the expense of retail cybersecurity, however, can cost a company more in the long run, given the rising size and costs of data breaches and associated revenue and reputational loss. electricity storage cost per kwh With extra web traffic and high order volumes coming in, the holiday shopping season can be a particularly perilous time for businesses seeking to safeguard customer information.

Tis the season for retailers to buckle down on security, since data breaches typically peak just prior to and during the holiday shopping season. IBM X-Force Incident Response and Intelligence Services (IRIS)’s assessment of X-Force Interactive Security Incident data recorded between 2012 and 2017 revealed that 41 percent of all retail and consumer product breaches occurred between September and December, elevating the risk for enterprise network breaches during that time of year. More than two-thirds of all records in the consumer products sector were leaked, lost or stolen during these last four months of the year — that’s nearly 180 million records each year. Don’t Reward the Naughty

A growing number of retailers now offer rewards programs to retain and nurture their customer bases. For shoppers to join these programs, most retailers ask for personally identifiable information (PII) such as name, address, phone number and email address. If ever compromised, an attacker can correlate this customer PII to payment data and use it to aggregate information to compromise the user’s identity.

Attackers don’t wait for the holiday season to begin launching spam campaigns, which are often employed as the first stage of their overall fraud and attack campaigns. gas in dogs symptoms Analysis of X-Force spam honeypot data collected between 2015 and 2018 revealed a notable rise in the average volume of spam emails beginning in August, with September slightly lower and October ranking third.

After a popular big box retailer suffered a breach in 2013, public awareness around the vulnerability of point-of-sale (POS) systems grew exponentially. That breach was facilitated by malware that infected POS machines and helped threat actors access a large volume of credit card information to sell to other criminals on the dark web. This intrusion resulted in the theft of more than 110 million records.

Five years later, POS malware continues to plague retailers. According to IBM X-Force, 74 percent of publicly reported POS malware breaches in 2017 impacted the retail sector. X-Force IRIS has observed malicious actors using POS malware, such as FrameworkPOS and PoSeidon, to siphon credit card data from POS terminals. Web-based malware, which steals credit card data on the fly as online transactions are processed, is also gaining steam.

Cybercriminals also commonly steal credit card data through payment card skimmers. electricity for beginners These physical devices are fitted into the mouth of card readers and work by copying track data from the credit card and storing it on a memory chip inside the skimming device. In addition to retail establishments, skimmers are often found in ATMs, restaurants and gas stations.

As a precaution, retailers should frequently search for devices on their POS terminals and swiping equipment. Attackers typically attach skimmers to the device by sliding them onto the scanners and collecting them later. To check for a skimmer, examine devices daily and pull on the scanner if anything appears different. If part of the device comes off, it may be a skimming device. gas in babies home remedies Call your service provider and IT security team to report it before resuming activity with that terminal or device.

With security controls and practices becoming more efficient, threat actors have resorted to gluing card skimmers to machines. This makes it difficult to detach by simply pulling it off the affected device. Retailers should train employees in all locations to recognize the proper look and components of their POS terminals and swiping devices. Employees should also know how to report suspicious devices. 2. gas in back and stomach A Clean Network Is a Safe Network

Account takeover (ATO), which occurs when a threat actor gains unauthorized access to an online account that belongs to someone else, can also affect e-commerce customers. With access to shoppers’ accounts, fraudsters can wreak havoc by stealing stored payment data, making fraudulent purchases and rerouting existing orders to a different address, for example.

To help keep customer data safe, even in cases where criminals manage to infiltrate assets, security teams should keep PII, financial data and POS information separate by segmenting enterprise networks. By keeping this information separated and encrypted, attackers will find it much harder to correlate data on customers. While segmenting a network can be an intensive process, it’s a small price to pay to keep customer data safe.

Nearly every company has some kind of data protection training in place. To make employee training programs more effective, organizations must understand that training materials are sometimes clicked through at a rapid pace to complete them as quickly as possible in favor of getting back to work. So how can an organization effectively educate their users?

For education to be effective, it has to be repetitive and stay top-of-mind for users across the entire organization. gas efficient suv 2014 Get management to support awareness campaigns and find opportunities to educate users. Having vigilant employees makes mitigating attacks during the holiday season that much more effective. Frequent email reminders, illustrative posters and communicating best practices during team meetings can demonstrate your organization’s commitment to secure day-to-day conduct. Giving users personalized attention can go a long way toward making the message resonate with them — for example, you might consider gifting a security-themed mug for the holiday season. 5. Use Network IP Whitelists and Blacklists

Whitelists are IP addresses or domains used specifically for allowing access, whereas blacklists are used to help prevent IP addresses or domains from entering a network. Whitelists and blacklists are useful for keeping unauthorized and authorized connections within or outside the network. Keeping these lists up-to-date demands some diligence, but they can be crucial to boosting network security.

There is no such thing as unimportant data. gas bijoux soho Take every necessary precaution to help protect enterprise and customer data by implementing strong retail cybersecurity controls, educating users and following current best practices. Maintaining customer confidence in your ability to protect their PII can result in more business, increased customer loyalty and stronger organizational reputation.