5 Survival strategies for camping on a budget electricity pictures information

Campendium provides information on over 27,000 campsites (free and paid), including national and state parks and RV parks. Listings include user reviews, fees, photos, cell coverage and other details. Some sites have no nightly rate but may require a paid pass to gain access.

Word to the wise: Free campsites don’t always include the amenities of paid campgrounds, says Kristin Addis, CEO of Be My Travel Muse, a travel blog. If you choose a free site, locate a place close by where you can clean up; Addis says she’s paid for a shower at campgrounds near free sites for less than the campgrounds’ overnight fee.

Travel light, says Tom Lionvale, a backpacking instructor and adjunct faculty member at College of the Sequoias in California. You don’t want too much to carry; 20 pounds not including food and water is a good guideline for backpacking, he says. Even if you’re not backpacking, camping with less means purchasing less gear.

And don’t forget about seasonal sales. For example, REI has an Anniversary Sale each May. You’ll also traditionally find lower prices on outdoor gear in October, the tail end of peak camping season. Another cost-saving option: Consider renting gear from an outdoor equipment store, particularly if you’re new to the experience.

If you’re traveling by RV, Easterling recommends looking for dump stations for waste disposal ahead of time. If you’ll need to get some sleep along the journey, search online for free overnight RV parking, such as at rest areas and truck stops. Be sure to check local rules, since policies on if and how long you can park can vary.

“If you’re going on a road trip from San Francisco and you want to get to the Grand Canyon, and you want to do it cheaply, utilize rest areas and utilize free campsites for just your quick overnighters as you’re trying to make those miles with your family,” Easterling says.

Campendium provides information on over 27,000 campsites (free and paid), including national and state parks and RV parks. Listings include user reviews, fees, photos, cell coverage and other details. Some sites have no nightly rate but may require a paid pass to gain access.

Word to the wise: Free campsites don’t always include the amenities of paid campgrounds, says Kristin Addis, CEO of Be My Travel Muse, a travel blog. If you choose a free site, locate a place close by where you can clean up; Addis says she’s paid for a shower at campgrounds near free sites for less than the campgrounds’ overnight fee.

Travel light, says Tom Lionvale, a backpacking instructor and adjunct faculty member at College of the Sequoias in California. You don’t want too much to carry; 20 pounds not including food and water is a good guideline for backpacking, he says. Even if you’re not backpacking, camping with less means purchasing less gear.

And don’t forget about seasonal sales. For example, REI has an Anniversary Sale each May. You’ll also traditionally find lower prices on outdoor gear in October, the tail end of peak camping season. Another cost-saving option: Consider renting gear from an outdoor equipment store, particularly if you’re new to the experience.

If you’re traveling by RV, Easterling recommends looking for dump stations for waste disposal ahead of time. If you’ll need to get some sleep along the journey, search online for free overnight RV parking, such as at rest areas and truck stops. Be sure to check local rules, since policies on if and how long you can park can vary.

“If you’re going on a road trip from San Francisco and you want to get to the Grand Canyon, and you want to do it cheaply, utilize rest areas and utilize free campsites for just your quick overnighters as you’re trying to make those miles with your family,” Easterling says.