7 Reasons your grocery bill is too high – the frugal girl hp gas online booking

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I know people swear by going store to store, depending on prices. Perhaps because there are fewer competitors in interior Alaska, there are not that many price differentials so going place to place is worth it only for a huge loss leader (like butter for $1.99 a pound would induce me to shop in the other major store that week.). What I have found that helps is getting to know the butcher and produce managers. More times than I can count I have been alerted to wait until next week to buy such and such because there is going to be a big sale, or I have been asked if I wanted to try a new product for free, or had something marked down when the sell-by date was tomorrow.

An example: yesterday I was checking over the cabbage, when the manager and I were chatting as he piled carrots up in the space next to me. I told him I was going to make cole slaw and he said that he had bagged cole slaw that had gone out of date that day if I wanted them—I never buy bagged cabbage because of the price but yesterday I came home with nine bags of free cole slaw mix. It was in perfect condition, just could not be sold. I used two bags for the slaw for a potluck. The rest I put into hot chicken stock and then froze the now cooked cabbage and stock in smaller containers. Next time I make soup, I’ll have the soup started—add some other vegetables and a leftover protein and dinner is on in 20 minutes. I have found these employees want to help if I need a smaller package of meat or a cheaper alternative. Sometimes they tip me off to the fact that there is an unannounced manager’s sale on something like eggs because they are over-stocked.

I know people swear by going store to store, depending on prices. Perhaps because there are fewer competitors in interior Alaska, there are not that many price differentials so going place to place is worth it only for a huge loss leader (like butter for $1.99 a pound would induce me to shop in the other major store that week.). What I have found that helps is getting to know the butcher and produce managers. More times than I can count I have been alerted to wait until next week to buy such and such because there is going to be a big sale, or I have been asked if I wanted to try a new product for free, or had something marked down when the sell-by date was tomorrow.

An example: yesterday I was checking over the cabbage, when the manager and I were chatting as he piled carrots up in the space next to me. I told him I was going to make cole slaw and he said that he had bagged cole slaw that had gone out of date that day if I wanted them—I never buy bagged cabbage because of the price but yesterday I came home with nine bags of free cole slaw mix. It was in perfect condition, just could not be sold. I used two bags for the slaw for a potluck. The rest I put into hot chicken stock and then froze the now cooked cabbage and stock in smaller containers. Next time I make soup, I’ll have the soup started—add some other vegetables and a leftover protein and dinner is on in 20 minutes. I have found these employees want to help if I need a smaller package of meat or a cheaper alternative. Sometimes they tip me off to the fact that there is an unannounced manager’s sale on something like eggs because they are over-stocked.