Aggressively improvised car repairs telecaster guitar forum electricity 220v

On a currently running Subaru ownership venting thread, which also contains some Hyundai content, I was just posting about this beater 2001 Hyundai Accent I had for awhile. It got me thinking about a few "extreme car repairs" I got away with on that car and a few others at various times of being a grown-ass, broke-ass man.

I had the friction material come off of the front brake pads on one front brake in that ’01 Accent, which scored the hell out of the brake rotor. Needed the car, like, now, and could only afford the cheapest set of front brake pads from Autozone. So while I had that front wheel off, and that corner up on a jack stand, I "turned" my own brake rotor by locking the emergency brake, starting the engine, and putting the car in drive. The other front wheel was still on the ground, so the rotor was spinning due to the idling engine. I took my angle grinder and carefully, lightly and gradually went to town on that rotor. Luckily only the outside rotor surface was scored; only that one pad lost its friction material. If I’d had to do the inside surface too, I might have had a problem.

I had a muffler disintegrate on a ’94 Cherokee 4.0 once, and I just broke out the welder and installed a length of straight pipe in its place, so my exhaust system was catalytic converter but no muffler, stock tailpipe still in place. Didn’t look altered unless you got underneath, and it wasn’t THAT loud…althought it did have a cool little inline-6 snarl after that. I ended up driving it like that for nearly a year.

My dad and uncle had to repair a similar problem in our slant-six ’64 Plymouth Belvedere wagon when I was a kid, but in their case they used a slit-open metal tennis-ball can wrapped around the pipe break and a bunch of twisted baling wire. That sounded like gentle under-car farting and we had to drive with the windows open until it got fixed right.

Also on that Belvedere, on a trip from Denver to Kansas City, the accelerator linkage broke once, late on a Sunday, and my dad rigged up a length of wire (speaker wire, I think) from the carb linkage, through a firewalll grommet, up onto the front bench seat, where he clamped on a pair of vise grip pliers. You pulled on the vise grips to open the throttle. I was about eight or ten years old, and dad had me "man the vise grips" for part of the time to give his hand and arm a rest. I remember thinking it was pretty cool to have a direct link to the car’s speed and throttle opening. I doubt I was very smooth at it as he worked the clutch and column-shift three-speed, but it’s kind of a cool memory.

On a currently running Subaru ownership venting thread, which also contains some Hyundai content, I was just posting about this beater 2001 Hyundai Accent I had for awhile. It got me thinking about a few "extreme car repairs" I got away with on that car and a few others at various times of being a grown-ass, broke-ass man.

I had the friction material come off of the front brake pads on one front brake in that ’01 Accent, which scored the hell out of the brake rotor. Needed the car, like, now, and could only afford the cheapest set of front brake pads from Autozone. So while I had that front wheel off, and that corner up on a jack stand, I "turned" my own brake rotor by locking the emergency brake, starting the engine, and putting the car in drive. The other front wheel was still on the ground, so the rotor was spinning due to the idling engine. I took my angle grinder and carefully, lightly and gradually went to town on that rotor. Luckily only the outside rotor surface was scored; only that one pad lost its friction material. If I’d had to do the inside surface too, I might have had a problem.

I had a muffler disintegrate on a ’94 Cherokee 4.0 once, and I just broke out the welder and installed a length of straight pipe in its place, so my exhaust system was catalytic converter but no muffler, stock tailpipe still in place. Didn’t look altered unless you got underneath, and it wasn’t THAT loud…althought it did have a cool little inline-6 snarl after that. I ended up driving it like that for nearly a year.

My dad and uncle had to repair a similar problem in our slant-six ’64 Plymouth Belvedere wagon when I was a kid, but in their case they used a slit-open metal tennis-ball can wrapped around the pipe break and a bunch of twisted baling wire. That sounded like gentle under-car farting and we had to drive with the windows open until it got fixed right.

Also on that Belvedere, on a trip from Denver to Kansas City, the accelerator linkage broke once, late on a Sunday, and my dad rigged up a length of wire (speaker wire, I think) from the carb linkage, through a firewalll grommet, up onto the front bench seat, where he clamped on a pair of vise grip pliers. You pulled on the vise grips to open the throttle. I was about eight or ten years old, and dad had me "man the vise grips" for part of the time to give his hand and arm a rest. I remember thinking it was pretty cool to have a direct link to the car’s speed and throttle opening. I doubt I was very smooth at it as he worked the clutch and column-shift three-speed, but it’s kind of a cool memory.

My father used to have a roll of asbestos cloth back in the 70’s. Cars would break pieces of exhaust pipe all the time. He would wrap the broken section with asbestos, then a soup can, and put breeze clamps / hose clamp over both ends to hold it together. This would typically last a two to ten weeks until you could get the parts replaced. We did that for an uncle’s car, and it got him back from NE Ohio to North Carolina – plus a week or two – until he could get it fixed. If we only knew how dangerous that asbestos cloth was. We have not had issues, but still.

Our neighbors growing up were hay farmers of very modest means. They had a tractor throw a belt waaaaaay out in the fields. They tied a bunch of bailing twine around the pulleys to make a belt – tightened it up as much as they could – and that got the afternoon completed and the tractor back to the barn for repairs. Bailing twine is some sturdy stuff.

I have been known to remove a door card, glue a sheet of denim material to a metal door frame, cut holes where the mounting pieces need to go, then replace the door card. This did wonders to eliminate squeaks and rattles for those 70’s and early 80’s GM cars. My 1976 Monza had a loose transition mount – I wrapped a nut in rubber, and placed it in the travel catch on the transmission to keep it from banging since the bushings had long since gone bad.

I had a friend at work tell me the spines on the output shaft of an old Saab were worn. He would take the tranny off every 6 months, and push pieces of paper clips into the splines to make proper contact, and push the tranny back on. He did that three or four time in college before he replaced the car.

1994 Grand AM – removed the middle HVAC vents, put packing foam between the underside of the vent and the radio to keep cold air from fogging the radio, then replace the vent. Easy fix to a really bad design issue. There were spots of construction adhesive I put under the dash on that car as well to prevent squeaks when the weather was "just wrong". When the window track wore out, I used a good sized suction cup to help guide the window up squarely. At that point, the car was 9 years old with 165,000 miles and failing, so no sense spending money to get it fixed.