Ahc earliest possible space program. alternate history discussion electricity 4th grade worksheet

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Well, the two major metals necessary for a viable space program, unless you were to have someone strike a Sea Dragon approach really early on, are aluminum and titanium. Aluminum was very expensive, as expensive as silver, until the Heroult Process made it economical to refine. This existed in the late 19th century, but people didn’t catch on to its use as a lightweight structural metal until it became incorporated into aircraft frames in the 1920s and 1930s. Perhaps faster airplane development in WWI can help the mass-production of aluminum along.

I can imagine one possible use would be a 1940s reconnaissance station. If either the Germans, Russians electricity kwh calculator, or (less likely IMO) the Americans come up with it, they can launch a small, one-man recon platform that stays in orbit for a few days at a time. This is not impossible even with primitive rockets. In fact, Al Shepard campaigned briefly to authorize a 3-day Mercury flight, so I’d say the right pilot and life-support system can handle the job. But you’d need earlier development of pressure suits, which would result from earlier high-altitude aircraft, hence my focus on more aluminum airplanes. Perhaps if Strategic Bombing is pursued more among military brass in the post-war period, we’d develop the technologies for this one-man recon platform by 1940.

Well e payment electricity bill bangalore, the two major metals necessary for a viable space program, unless you were to have someone strike a Sea Dragon approach really early on, are aluminum and titanium. Aluminum was very expensive, as expensive as silver, until the Heroult Process made it economical to refine. This existed in the late 19th century, but people didn’t catch on to its use as a lightweight structural metal until it became incorporated into aircraft frames in the 1920s and 1930s. Perhaps faster airplane development in WWI can help the mass-production of aluminum along f gas regulations.

I can imagine one possible use would be a 1940s reconnaissance station. If either the Germans, Russians, or (less likely IMO) the Americans come up with it, they can launch a small, one-man recon platform that stays in orbit for a few days at a time. This is not impossible even with primitive rockets. In fact, Al Shepard campaigned briefly to authorize a 3-day Mercury flight, so I’d say the right pilot and life-support system can grade 6 electricity unit ontario handle the job. But you’d need earlier development of pressure suits, which would result from earlier high-altitude aircraft, hence my focus on more aluminum airplanes. Perhaps if Strategic Bombing is pursued more among military brass in the post-war period, we’d develop the technologies for this one-man recon platform by 1940.

Click to expand…It’s worse than that, Polish Eagle. To make reliable, high(ish) thrust engines requires rare and advanced materials that are going to be hard to come by early on, and good manufacturing techniques. Further, there are difficulties in forcing the propellants into the engine itself. Modern engines generally use pressure-fed engines, usually using helium or nitrogen to pressurize, or turbopumps/pumps. The latter we can dismiss out of hand as far too complicated, while the former relies on the ability electricity transformer health risks to isolate non-reactive gases, something which only appeared on a labratory scale in the late 1800s.

Then there’s the heat issue. Again, modern rocket engines usually use extremely complex and delicate arrangements of fuel piping that make up the nozzle’s outer chambers to prevent the nozzle from melting (even the toughest materiels melt under the heat of a kerolox or hydrolox torch), or ablative techniques that rely on materials and designs that allow the nozzle to evenly burn off without affecting flight. The latter can, again, be dismissed as requiring far too advanced materials science, while the former has obvious fabrication issues that make it difficult to correctly manufacture.

It’s worse than that, Polish Eagle. To make reliable, high(ish) thrust engines requires rare and advanced materials that are going to be hard to come by early on, and good manufacturing techniques. Further, there are difficulties in forcing the propellants into the engine itself. Modern engines generally use pressure-fed engines, usually using e gasoline helium or nitrogen to pressurize, or turbopumps/pumps. The latter we can dismiss out of hand as far too complicated, while the former relies on the ability to isolate non-reactive gases, something which only appeared on a labratory scale in the late 1800s.

Then there’s the heat issue. Again, modern rocket engines usually use extremely complex and delicate arrangements of fuel piping that make up the nozzle’s outer chambers to prevent the nozzle from melting (even the toughest materiels melt under the heat of a kerolox or hydrolox torch), or ablative techniques that rely on materials and designs that allow the nozzle to evenly burn off without affecting flight. The latter can, again, be dismissed as requiring far too advanced materials science, while the former has obvious fabrication issues that gas numbers stove temperature make it difficult to correctly manufacture.