Alaskan way viaduct – home gas apple pay

The restored Alaskan Way will look much like it did the first time around. It will generally have two lanes in each direction, providing access to Colman Dock and waterfront businesses and buildings. Near the viaduct demolition work zone, the road may be narrowed to one lane in each direction, but access to Colman Dock and other properties will always be preserved.

You can watch this road work from the construction camera we have mounted atop the tunnel’s south operations building. This south portal work is part of the SR 99 Connections Project, which is currently performing utility and roadwork on East Frontage Road South, between South Royal Brougham Way and South Atlantic Street.

Crews hope to complete as much work as possible before the tunnel is ready to open. The final ramp connections, as you can tell from that map above, will go across the SR 99 mainline. So when the tunnel is ready, we will need to close SR 99 for approximately three weeks to realign the highway and connect it to the tunnel. We do not have a date for the closure yet, but we will be able to provide notice four to six weeks in advance.

At the time, Seattle Tunnel Partners was working on the double-deck highway inside the tunnel and had completed about half of the upper roadway deck. Since Bertha’s dramatic breakthrough, the machine has been fully disassembled and crews have finished building the roadways and walls inside the tunnel.

The machine needed to be removed from the tunnel so crews could finish the tunnel’s roadways. STP spent four months disassembling the machine, cutting it up into pieces small enough to be lifted out by crane. Roughly 8,300 tons of machinery were hauled out of the disassembly pit, to be repurposed or recycled. Approximately 6,850 tons of metal were sent to be recycled, but pieces of Bertha’s signature cutterhead were donated to the Port of Seattle and cutting tools and the machine’s control panel were given to Seattle’s Museum of History and Industry.

Since Bertha placed the last tunnel ring, crews have made great progress on the structures and systems inside. The roadways and walls inside the tunnel are done, with the last of the roadway panels that make up the tunnel’s northbound (lower) deck placed last month. Crews are hard at work installing the electrical, ventilation and other systems that will make the tunnel functional and safe.

At the north and south portals, all signs of Bertha’s support equipment and the large pits that bookended the machine’s journey have disappeared. Crews have covered the launch pit and are preparing to build new city streets and intersections. The disassembly pit at the north end has been covered and the final section of the north operations building is taking shape on the surface.

While the past year has seen impressive progress, there’s still plenty of work left to do. Before the tunnel opens, crews must finish installing the tunnel’s mechanical, electrical and plumbing systems, then test them to ensure they function properly. Stay tuned as we continue to report contractors’ progress building toward the tunnel’s opening, which could happen as early as this fall.