An egg a day might reduce your risk of heart disease, study says – kifi gasco abu dhabi careers

####

Commonly called heart disease, cardiovascular disease includes heart failure, arrhythmias and heart valve problems in addition to strokes and attacks. Raised blood pressure, carrying too much weight or obesity, and elevated blood sugar all contribute to the risk of cardiovascular disease, which is triggered by unhealthy diet, physical inactivity, smoking and harmful use of alcohol. ‘Controversial’ nutrition source

Though eggs contain high-quality protein and other positive nutritional components, they also have high amounts of cholesterol, which was thought might be harmful, explained Canqing Yu, a co-author of the study and an associate professor in the Peking University School of Public Health in Beijing.

Yet "existing studies on the association between egg and cardiovascular diseases are controversial due to small sample size and limited information," Yu wrote in an email. Past studies have provided only limited evidence from the Chinese population, "which have huge differences in dietary habits, lifestyle behaviors and diseases patterns," Yu said.

Over nearly nine years, the research team tracked this select group. They focused on major coronary events, such as heart attacks and strokes, including hemorrhagic strokes — when a blood vessel bursts in the brain due, usually, to uncontrolled high blood pressure — and ischemic strokes — when a blood vessel feeding the brain becomes blocked, usually by a blood clot.

"Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of deaths in China, which accounted for half of the total mortality," Yu said. "Stroke, including hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke, is the first cause of premature death, followed by ischemic heart disease."

In fact, participants who ate up to one egg daily had a 26% lower risk of hemorrhagic stroke, which is more common in China than in the United States or other high-income countries. Additionally, the egg eaters had a 28% lower risk of dying from this type of stroke.

Based on the results, Yu said, eating eggs in moderation — less than one a day — is associated with a lower incidence of cardiovascular diseases, especially hemorrhagic stroke. Even more, the new research is "by far the most powerful project to detect such an effect," he said.

On the downside, the research team collected only "crude information" about egg consumption from participants, and this prevented them from estimating effects "more precisely," Yu said. "We should [also] be cautious when interpreting our results in a context of different dietary and lifestyle characteristics from China." Part of a healthy diet

Caroline Richard, an assistant professor of agricultural life and environmental sciences at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, said the new study is simply observational and so cannot show a direct cause and effect between eating eggs and risk of heart disease.

"In this study however, they didn’t assess the risk of developing diabetes, which may be because diabetes is a newer disease in the Chinese population and there is not good documentation of who has it," Richard said. Still, she noted, "this will be very important data for helping develop dietary prevention guidelines in China."

Cardiovascular disease, which takes the lives of 17.7 million people every year, is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide, according to the World Health Organization. Cardiovascular disease causes nearly a third — 31% — of all global deaths each year.