Armed bystanders kill shooter at oklahoma city restaurant gas emoji

"They were able to shoot this suspect and put an end to this very dangerous situation," Mathews said, adding that the men — Carlos Nazario, 35, and Bryan Wittle, 39 — did not know each other. It’s not clear who fired the fatal shot. Police initially said only one man fired on the attacker.

The bystanders’ actions were "well within their legal rights" and likely would be protected by good Samaritan laws, Mathews said. He deferred a final call to the Oklahoma County district attorney, whose staff did not immediately respond to CNN’s request for comment.

The National Rifle Association quickly seized on the incident as "just another example of how the best way to stop a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun," according to a tweet. The powerful gun rights lobbying group commonly touts the mantra as part of its strategy in the wake of gun violence to identify ways — apart from restricting firearms — to enhance public safety.

When gunfire erupted Thursday at Louie’s, in northwest Oklahoma City, "it sounded like, you know, any kind of restaurant noise, a rack of plates crashing … glass breaking," Ron Benton, who was inside the cafe when the shooting began, told CNN affiliate KFOR.

"A guy jumped out of it and went for the back of his vehicle. I just assumed maybe it was an off-duty officer or something like that," he said. "It was just the way he moved, whoever it was. He just appeared to be somebody who had some training, some weapon training."

"They were able to shoot this suspect and put an end to this very dangerous situation," Mathews said, adding that the men — Carlos Nazario, 35, and Bryan Wittle, 39 — did not know each other. It’s not clear who fired the fatal shot. Police initially said only one man fired on the attacker.

The bystanders’ actions were "well within their legal rights" and likely would be protected by good Samaritan laws, Mathews said. He deferred a final call to the Oklahoma County district attorney, whose staff did not immediately respond to CNN’s request for comment.

The National Rifle Association quickly seized on the incident as "just another example of how the best way to stop a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun," according to a tweet. The powerful gun rights lobbying group commonly touts the mantra as part of its strategy in the wake of gun violence to identify ways — apart from restricting firearms — to enhance public safety.

When gunfire erupted Thursday at Louie’s, in northwest Oklahoma City, "it sounded like, you know, any kind of restaurant noise, a rack of plates crashing … glass breaking," Ron Benton, who was inside the cafe when the shooting began, told CNN affiliate KFOR.

"A guy jumped out of it and went for the back of his vehicle. I just assumed maybe it was an off-duty officer or something like that," he said. "It was just the way he moved, whoever it was. He just appeared to be somebody who had some training, some weapon training."

"They were able to shoot this suspect and put an end to this very dangerous situation," Mathews said, adding that the men — Carlos Nazario, 35, and Bryan Wittle, 39 — did not know each other. It’s not clear who fired the fatal shot. Police initially said only one man fired on the attacker.

The bystanders’ actions were "well within their legal rights" and likely would be protected by good Samaritan laws, Mathews said. He deferred a final call to the Oklahoma County district attorney, whose staff did not immediately respond to CNN’s request for comment.

The National Rifle Association quickly seized on the incident as "just another example of how the best way to stop a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun," according to a tweet. The powerful gun rights lobbying group commonly touts the mantra as part of its strategy in the wake of gun violence to identify ways — apart from restricting firearms — to enhance public safety.

When gunfire erupted Thursday at Louie’s, in northwest Oklahoma City, "it sounded like, you know, any kind of restaurant noise, a rack of plates crashing … glass breaking," Ron Benton, who was inside the cafe when the shooting began, told CNN affiliate KFOR.

"A guy jumped out of it and went for the back of his vehicle. I just assumed maybe it was an off-duty officer or something like that," he said. "It was just the way he moved, whoever it was. He just appeared to be somebody who had some training, some weapon training."

"They were able to shoot this suspect and put an end to this very dangerous situation," Mathews said, adding that the men — Carlos Nazario, 35, and Bryan Wittle, 39 — did not know each other. It’s not clear who fired the fatal shot. Police initially said only one man fired on the attacker.

The bystanders’ actions were "well within their legal rights" and likely would be protected by good Samaritan laws, Mathews said. He deferred a final call to the Oklahoma County district attorney, whose staff did not immediately respond to CNN’s request for comment.

The National Rifle Association quickly seized on the incident as "just another example of how the best way to stop a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun," according to a tweet. The powerful gun rights lobbying group commonly touts the mantra as part of its strategy in the wake of gun violence to identify ways — apart from restricting firearms — to enhance public safety.

When gunfire erupted Thursday at Louie’s, in northwest Oklahoma City, "it sounded like, you know, any kind of restaurant noise, a rack of plates crashing … glass breaking," Ron Benton, who was inside the cafe when the shooting began, told CNN affiliate KFOR.

"A guy jumped out of it and went for the back of his vehicle. I just assumed maybe it was an off-duty officer or something like that," he said. "It was just the way he moved, whoever it was. He just appeared to be somebody who had some training, some weapon training."