(Article) if sf is so great, why is everyone leaving – san francisco – oakland – california (ca) – page 16 – city-data forum gas city indiana zip code

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Change is certainly inevitable, no matter where you go. The bolded part of your comment does resonate wtih me Leona. And do understand Leona, the minute you use the word Liberal or Democrat, you are going to get ugliness in return as many people are a bit hypersensitive when it comes to politics (so your viewpoint is not welcome, regardless of how valid it is).

I lived in San Francisco for decades and saw first hand what happened to it (and it was pretty predictable). But there are times when you just deal with things for a variety of reasons (and for me, that was my wife). I had told her in the early 2000s that I’d prefer leaving. Her one tie to the area was her aging father, and like the article, most of her friends had relocated due to the COL. It took me over a decade to convince my wife, but I finally won out and we left in 2017. We still have property there and that’s about 2015 electricity rates the only thing I’m thankful for (the cash flow is affording us a very comfortable lifestyle in the Austin area). And because of that, I’m thankful there are people that don’t mind paying through the nose for our property.

Rather than focus on the politics, I will just say there is a certain elitism that exists in the SF Bay Area now that I simply don’t want any part of. I think it’s a combination of extremely wealthy people pushing ideas that will eventually lead to only the top 3% in income living there. It is unfortunate that many people of very modest means don’t even seem to realize it and seem almost brainwashed to cut their own wrists by simply going along with it. Then you have the young people that think the solution is to overpopulate the area (not that it’s not already overpopulated). That’s always been amusing to me as I’ve never met a single person that thinks it’s cool to call 500 sf a home.

More and more, over the years, I’ve noticed a certain fakeness to the people there. And if you don’t believe me on this one, then the next time you run across someone at the gym, or maybe an acquaintance on the street and they say hey we should do lunch one day. Don’t just say that sounds good but rather try and nail them down to a day on the electricity 4th grade worksheet spot and see how successful you are. That one always puts a smile on my face. People actually don’t want to get together with you. And admittedly, part of the reason for that is they simply don’t have the time because they’re working so damn much to survive there. I also found as I walked my neighborhood with my dog at the time, I was lucky if I got 50% of the people to acknowledge me as I smiled and said good morning. More so, there would be a what the hell npower electricity supplier number do you want look on people’s faces (how dare me for being friendly and saying hello).

By contrast, we’ve lived north of Austin for over a year now, and only one guy actually ruined my perfect record of people smiling at me and saying hi right back. A real genuine friendliness to folks around here. But I knew I was in heaven when during the election, there were signs of Ted Cruz on one lawn, and right next door a sign with Beto O’Rourke. And as I walked by many of the houses, those neighbors were talking with each other, laughing about things, going place together, etc. And I thought to myself, are you kidding me!. In the echo chamber I was living at, that Cruz supporter would have been treated like he had Leprosy. He would have found life socially expensive in the Bay Area, basically living as a hermit if he even let his viewpoint be known. I was simply amazed at the civility I saw (after kite electricity generation living in the SF Bay Area for so many years, I forgot that most areas of the country aren’t like SF or Berkeley).

It’s unfortunate that some take offense to posts like these and would prefer they be censored or diminished. I’ve always enjoyed reading about others experiences outside the area and know many people who want to get a different perspective. Not every family makes over $200k a year, and articles like the one in the original post and comments from others are helpful to some of us making decisions on possible relocations.

Change is certainly inevitable, no matter where you go. The bolded part of your comment does resonate wtih me Leona. And do understand Leona, the minute you use the word Liberal or Democrat, you are going to get ugliness in return as many people are a bit hypersensitive when it comes to politics (so your viewpoint is not welcome, regardless of how valid it is).

I lived in San Francisco for decades and saw first hand what happened to it (and it was pretty predictable). But there are times when you just deal with things for a variety of reasons (and for me, that was my wife). I had told her in the early 2000s that I’d prefer leaving. Her one tie to the area was her aging father, and like the article, most of her friends had relocated due to the COL. It took me over a decade to convince my wife, but I finally won out and we left in 2017. We still have property there and that’s about the only thing I’m thankful for (the cash flow is affording us a very comfortable lifestyle in the Austin area). And gas after eating because of that, I’m thankful there are people that don’t mind paying through the nose for our property.

Rather than focus on the politics, I will just say there is a certain elitism that exists in the SF Bay Area now that I simply don’t want any part of. I think it’s a combination of extremely wealthy people pushing ideas that will eventually lead to only the top 3% in income living there. It is unfortunate that many people of very modest means don’t even seem to realize it and seem almost brainwashed to cut their own wrists by simply going along with it. Then you have the young people that think the solution is to overpopulate the area (not that it’s not already overpopulated). That’s always been amusing to me as I’ve never met a single person that thinks it’s cool to call 500 sf a home.

More and more, over the years, I’ve noticed a certain fakeness to the people there. And if you don’t believe me on this one, then the next time you run electricity 80s song across someone at the gym, or maybe an acquaintance on the street and they say hey we should do lunch one day. Don’t just say that sounds good but rather try and nail them down to a day on the spot and see how successful you are. That one always puts a smile on my face. People actually don’t want to get together with you. And admittedly, part of the reason for that is they simply don’t have the time because they’re working so damn much to survive there. I also found as I walked my neighborhood with my dog at the time, I was lucky if I got 50% of the people to acknowledge me as I smiled and said good morning. More so, there would be a what the hell do you want look on people’s faces (how dare me for being friendly and saying hello).

By contrast, we’ve lived north of Austin for over a year now, and only one guy actually ruined my perfect record of people smiling at me and saying hi right back. A real genuine friendliness to folks around here. But I knew I was in heaven when during the election, there were signs of Ted Cruz on one lawn, and right next door a sign with Beto O’Rourke. And as I walked by many of the houses, those neighbors were talking with each other, laughing about things, going place together, etc. And I thought to myself, are you kidding me!. In the echo chamber I was living at, that Cruz supporter would have been treated like he had Leprosy. He would have found life socially expensive in the Bay Area, basically living as a hermit if he even let his viewpoint be known. I was simply amazed at the civility I saw (after living in the SF Bay Area for so many years, I forgot that most areas of the country aren’t like SF or Berkeley).

It’s unfortunate that some take offense to posts like these and would prefer they be censored or diminished. I’ve always enjoyed reading about others experiences outside the area and know many people who want to get a different perspective. Not every p gasol stats family makes over $200k a year, and articles like the one in the original post and comments from others are helpful to some of us making decisions on possible relocations.