Austronesian comparative dictionary – languages i gastroenterology

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kapkap to grope, feel for something with kansas gas service login the hands without light and without seeing (as in a dark room, in one’s pockets for money, in walking along in the dark; this word has decided sexual connotations without proper context, since the word is used of intimate caressing; method of fishing and gathering shrimp and crabs , i.e. use of the bare hands

menoa, menua area of land held and used by a distinct community, esp. longhouse ( rumah), including house, farms, gardens, fruit groves, cemetery, water and all forest within half a day’s journey. Use of the menoa is only gained and maintained by much effort and danger, and by proper rites to secure and preserve a ritual harmony of all within it and the unseen forces involved; home, abode, place, district, country, region

niboŋ tall prickly cluster palms, Oncosperma spp.: Oncosperma horridum Scheff. ( bayas) growing inland; Oncosperma tigillarium (filamentosum) Blume ( niboŋ proper) coastal, with leaves arched; niboŋ wood resists teredo and termites; yields posts, piles, ribs of leaf thatch, split flooring; spines make blowpipe darts; fruit can be used as betel ( pinaŋ) and the t gas terengganu ‘cabbage’ ( upaʔ) is edible

tubai plants with poisonous juice used esp. to stupefy fish; tubai is one of the gifts made to mankind by the snake deities of Panggau; plants include Derris spp.: Derris malaccensis Prain, D. elegans Benth., D. thyrsiflora Benth., D. elliptica Benth., D. trifoliate Lour. ( D. uliginosa Benth.); Diospyros spp. (trees, … of which unripe fruit is used; Croton spp.; Diospyros spp. (yam climbers – tubers used); Calophyllum muscigerum Boerl. et Koord.; Barringtonia spp.; Linostoma pauciflora Griff. (shrub?); Blumea balsamifera Ham., Sapium indicum Willd. (coastal tree), and others; a little fresh root crushed in a cup of water will kill a man if he drinks it; a large scale tubai-fishing is a social occasion under an organizer ( tuai)

búbuŋ peak of the pyramidal roof of an Ifugaw house or granary consisting of a couple of grass bundles attached to and above the grass that already covers the highest parts of the topmost roof slope and upper ends of the rafters. Thus, these bundles of grass constitute the outside búbuŋ. Since the grass bundles are firmly attached to, and the twelve rafters nailed to a wooden disk, the disk which helps support the rafters constitutes, together with the tops of the rafters, the inside búbuŋ, and is rightly called búbuŋ or ambubúŋan/

būhul gas variables pogil an enemy of a village; i.e. a person of another village; wartime; for two or more hostile villages to engage in warfare against each other. Traditionally warfare was potentially engaged in with any village with which there was not a truce agreement ( bayaw). Warfare was caused gas turbine by disputes over territorial boundaries or use of public forests. Rampant and serious theft or more trivial matters could finally result in warfare. The heads of enemies killed in battle were taken, and sometimes hands or feet, and ceremonies involving these body parts performed

Dāya The Heavens (includes the earth’s atmosphere, touched by mountain peaks, where birds fly; it is the location of clouds, and the source of meteorological events, as rain, hail, thunder and lightning, storms and the like. The territory also includes outer space and involves spirits relating to, and named after various celestial bodies, such as the sun, moon, numerous named stars, sunlight and so forth)

dáya cosmic Upstream Region, extending beyond the Sky Cupola; it is conceived as surrounding half of the earth; the cosmic Upstream Region is inhabited by the gods and spirits of the Dáya, who dwell in a number of villages situated gas emoji meaning above the lower part of the Sky Cupola; the stem dáya is also applied to any site of the Earth proper that lies nearer the cosmic Dáya (i.e. more upstream) than the habitat of the person who speaks

halp-on for someone to dam a river for fishing. A relatively deep place in a river is chosen; below the area arrow-grass canes ( bilāu) are placed, held by stones as a screen ( hābay), to allow water, but not fish, to pass. Above the area a dam ( bātug) is constructed to stop the flow of water into the area, which is then scooped out. River fish, eels, crabs, and edible tadpoles are caught in the shallow water.

hápu allotment, apportionment, i.e. act of dividing things into two parts (not necessarily equal parts), and thus allotting one part to the kinship group of the husband and the other part to the kinship group of the wife; applied to butchered meat that has not been consumed in a festive banquet, but also to movable possessions, as jewels, in cases of divorce

būhul an enemy of a village; i.e. a person of another village; wartime; for two or more hostile villages to engage in warfare against each other. Traditionally static electricity bill nye full episode warfare was potentially engaged in with any village with which there was not a truce agreement ( bayaw). Warfare was caused by disputes over territorial boundaries or use of public forests. Rampant and serious theft or more trivial matters could finally result in warfare. The heads of enemies killed in battle were taken, and sometimes hands or feet, and ceremonies involving these body parts performed

Dāya The Heavens (includes the earth’s atmosphere, touched by mountain peaks, where birds fly; it is the location of clouds, and the gasset y ortega filosofia source of meteorological events, as rain, hail, thunder and lightning, storms and the like. The territory also includes outer space and involves spirits relating to, and named after various celestial bodies, such as the sun, moon, numerous named stars, sunlight and so forth)

halp-on for someone to dam a river for fishing. A relatively deep place in a river is chosen; below the area arrow-grass canes ( bilāu) are placed, held by stones as a screen ( hābay), to allow water, but not fish, to pass. Above the area a dam ( bātug) is constructed to stop the flow of water into the area, which is then scooped out. River fish, eels, crabs, and edible tadpoles are caught in the shallow water.