Barletta, trump backer, wins gop nod to take on sen. casey fox news electricity prices per kwh 2013

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"This election will be a choice between a candidate who fights for working families and a candidate who fights for the corporate interests that stack the deck against them," Casey’s campaign said in a statement. "It will be a choice between a candidate who stands up to President Trump when he’s wrong and a candidate who believes President Trump can do no wrong."

Barletta‘s victory continues President Trump’s winning streak in contested Republican primaries. Barletta was a Trump supporter before the 2016 presidential nomination was settled. That loyalty earned him Trump’s early support in the Senate race, as well as recorded telephone calls last weekend featuring the president backing Barletta "fully, strongly and proudly."

Wagner, a waste-hauling millionaire, pumped more than $10 million of his own cash into his campaign and has spread hundreds of thousands more around the state since last year to boost GOP committees and candidates. But he will be an underdog against Wolf, who holds a substantial money advantage: Wolf headed into May with $14 million in his campaign account, while Wagner reported $2.2 million.

A whopping 84 candidates were running in the Keystone State’s 18 House districts Tuesday, more than in any election year since 1984 when the state had 23 seats in the House. Seven of those 18 seats are vacant, due in large part to the departures of five Republican lawmakers who either have resigned or are not running again.

The Pennsylvania Supreme Court added another wrinkle to the race in February, when it redrew the district boundaries in a way many observers considered favorable to Democrats. However, the overload of open seats has resulted in several oversized Democratic primary fields – such as in the new 7th District, where six Democrats were running to replace Republican Rep. Charlie Dent, who has stepped down. No fewer than ten Democrats were running in suburban Philadelphia’s 5th District, where Rep. Patrick Meehan resigned last month amid allegations he sexually harassed a former employee. Both districts voted for Hillary Clinton over Donald Trump in the 2016 presidential election.

In the southwest corner of the state, the new 14th District offered a chance at redemption for state Rep. Rick Saccone. In March, Saccone narrowly lost a U.S. House special election to Democrat Conor Lamb in the old 18th District, which overwhelmingly voted for Trump in 2016.

On Monday, Saccone told Fox News that the 14th District was "a much stronger district for a person like me." Early projections on Tuesday showed Reschenthaler leading Saccone by a 55 to 45 percent margin during Tuesday night’s primary, The Hill reported, citing 97 percent of precints.

Elsewhere, Democratic voters in the new 1st District were deciding between millionaire trial lawyer Scott Wallace and Rachel Reddick, a former Navy officer. Wallace, who has spent heavily on the race, has fought allegations of carpetbagging over his move back to his home state from Maryland after he reportedly was recruited to run. Others have criticized Reddick for being a registered Republican until 2016.

Polling day was marked by stormy weather that knocked out power to a handful of polling stations near Scranton, delaying the counting of paper ballots, while a storm-related gas leak temporarily closed a polling place in the tiny borough of Delaware Water Gap, in the Poconos, according to the Pocono Record. Officials there kept it open until 10:30 p.m.

"This election will be a choice between a candidate who fights for working families and a candidate who fights for the corporate interests that stack the deck against them," Casey’s campaign said in a statement. "It will be a choice between a candidate who stands up to President Trump when he’s wrong and a candidate who believes President Trump can do no wrong."

Barletta’s victory continues President Trump’s winning streak in contested Republican primaries. Barletta was a Trump supporter before the 2016 presidential nomination was settled. That loyalty earned him Trump’s early support in the Senate race, as well as recorded telephone calls last weekend featuring the president backing Barletta "fully, strongly and proudly."

Wagner, a waste-hauling millionaire, pumped more than $10 million of his own cash into his campaign and has spread hundreds of thousands more around the state since last year to boost GOP committees and candidates. But he will be an underdog against Wolf, who holds a substantial money advantage: Wolf headed into May with $14 million in his campaign account, while Wagner reported $2.2 million.

A whopping 84 candidates were running in the Keystone State’s 18 House districts Tuesday, more than in any election year since 1984 when the state had 23 seats in the House. Seven of those 18 seats are vacant, due in large part to the departures of five Republican lawmakers who either have resigned or are not running again.

The Pennsylvania Supreme Court added another wrinkle to the race in February, when it redrew the district boundaries in a way many observers considered favorable to Democrats. However, the overload of open seats has resulted in several oversized Democratic primary fields – such as in the new 7th District, where six Democrats were running to replace Republican Rep. Charlie Dent, who has stepped down. No fewer than ten Democrats were running in suburban Philadelphia’s 5th District, where Rep. Patrick Meehan resigned last month amid allegations he sexually harassed a former employee. Both districts voted for Hillary Clinton over Donald Trump in the 2016 presidential election.

In the southwest corner of the state, the new 14th District offered a chance at redemption for state Rep. Rick Saccone. In March, Saccone narrowly lost a U.S. House special election to Democrat Conor Lamb in the old 18th District, which overwhelmingly voted for Trump in 2016.

On Monday, Saccone told Fox News that the 14th District was "a much stronger district for a person like me." Early projections on Tuesday showed Reschenthaler leading Saccone by a 55 to 45 percent margin during Tuesday night’s primary, The Hill reported, citing 97 percent of precints.

Elsewhere, Democratic voters in the new 1st District were deciding between millionaire trial lawyer Scott Wallace and Rachel Reddick, a former Navy officer. Wallace, who has spent heavily on the race, has fought allegations of carpetbagging over his move back to his home state from Maryland after he reportedly was recruited to run. Others have criticized Reddick for being a registered Republican until 2016.

Polling day was marked by stormy weather that knocked out power to a handful of polling stations near Scranton, delaying the counting of paper ballots, while a storm-related gas leak temporarily closed a polling place in the tiny borough of Delaware Water Gap, in the Poconos, according to the Pocono Record. Officials there kept it open until 10:30 p.m.