Bbc – capital – the city where innovation is driven by necessity gas definition physics

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Gabre-Madhin offers M-Pesa – a mobile banking company based in Kenya – as an example of how technology can uniquely transform developing economies. “Because there wasn’t bricks and mortar banking set up, we didn’t have legacy systems that had to be dismantled to go to mobile banking,” she says. Agriculture, education and healthcare systems are ripe electricity history timeline for such technological “leapfrogging” too.

One Ethiopian example is Flowius, a start-up taking a radical approach to building affordable water pipelines by using mobile surveying tools, solar power and microfinance. “There are so many people who walk for water,” says Markos Lemma, co-founder of Flowius. “We want innovation that contextually makes sense. Finding local solutions for local problems, instead of adopting solutions all the time.”

Lemma is also the co-founder of iceaddis, another innovation hub down the road from blueMoon set up in 2011 as the first of its kind in Addis Ababa. In recent years he’s seen young Ethiopians’ interest in technology blossom. “It’s crazy!” he exclaims, looking out over Bole’s bustling streets. “It feels like it’s happening right now. It’s opening up.”

In less than a decade, around 100 start-ups have emerged out of Addis Ababa’s nascent tech ecosystem. Every day Lemma receives several meeting electricity how it works requests from technology enthusiasts, asking for advice on how to bring their product to market. He believes a dramatic rise in internet access is a major factor in this change – increasing from 1% of individuals using the internet in 2011 to more than 15% today. The expansion of mobile phone networks, alongside falling smartphone prices, have led to a similar increase in internet users across sub-Saharan Africa. “When more people are connected to the internet, they know what is out there,” he says. “It creates a lot of excitement and motivation.”

Wondim and her hydroponics start-up are a case in point. “Before I applied to blueMoon, I used to experiment watching YouTube and I came across this technology. I was really surprised that we can grow crops gas and water company without soil,” she says. Taking this existing technology, Wondim then created a new business model – one moulded to Ethiopian society.

“The youth think that agriculture and farming is outdated, and are even abandoning their parents’ and grandparents’ land,” she explains. “If we make it more high-tech, we can promote the youth into that business.” GroHydro systems are also being designed for refugees in Ethiopia’s urban centres who are often marginalised. Not only does this empower refugees with an income, but Wondim hopes that through business a dialogue will be created between refugees and Ethiopians. “We need to start some kind of engagement,” she says.

Lemma points to a traditional crowd-saving practice – called Equb – in which family members and friends regularly put money into a shared pot, and then wait their turn for the dividends. Recently this Ethiopian c gastronomie vitam custom has been digitised into a mobile app. “You wouldn’t think about this in another market, unless you had that culture,” he says.

While Addis Ababa is teeming with innovative ideas like these, turning them into marketable products is an uphill struggle. For decades, Ethiopia’s business environment has remained conservative and bureaucratic. “Commercialisation for any business here is hard, but if you’re looking at tech innovation, it’s way harder,” says Lemma. The procedure to open or close a new business is lengthy and expensive – the antithesis of the gas out start-up model.

Yet the rapid liberalisation of Ethiopia’s economy carries with it the risk of neo-colonialism. Getnet Assefa, the co-founder of iCog Labs and an ardent support of many of Abiy’s reforms notes that most of the technology companies in Kenya and Nigeria are foreign-owned. “Yes, they have a lot of investment,” he says. “But if you look at it in terms of homegrown tech, Ethiopia is doing reasonably well.” Assefa believes the government must tread a line between encouraging foreign investment and fostering the growth of Ethiopian tech companies.

In July, Abiy met with Sophia the Robot, who was partly built at iCog Labs. “We programmed Sophia to speak a small amount of Amharic for the prime minister,” says Assefa. As much as Abiy’s appearance power quiz questions was a publicity stunt, it signalled his commitment to the technology sector. “People are now seeing Ethiopia in a different eye, not just poverty and politics,” says Assefa.

Gabre-Madhin offers M-Pesa – a mobile banking company based in Kenya – as an example of how technology can uniquely transform developing economies. “Because there wasn’t bricks and mortar banking set up, we didn’t have legacy systems that had to be dismantled to go to mobile banking,” she says. Agriculture, education and healthcare systems are ripe for such technological “leapfrogging” too.

One Ethiopian example is Flowius, a start-up taking a radical approach to building affordable water pipelines by using mobile surveying tools, solar power and microfinance. “There are so many people who walk for water,” says eon gas card top up Markos Lemma, co-founder of Flowius. “We want innovation that contextually makes sense. Finding local solutions for local problems, instead of adopting solutions all the time.”

Lemma is also the co-founder of iceaddis, another innovation hub down the road from blueMoon set up in 2011 as the first of its kind in Addis Ababa. In recent years he’s seen young Ethiopians’ interest in technology blossom. “It’s crazy!” he exclaims, looking out over Bole’s bustling streets. “It feels like it’s happening right now. It’s opening up.”

In less than a decade, around 100 start-ups have emerged out of Addis Ababa’s nascent tech ecosystem. Every day Lemma receives several meeting requests from technology enthusiasts, asking for advice on how to bring their product to market. He believes a dramatic rise in internet access is a major factor in this change – increasing from 1% of individuals using the internet in 2011 to more than 15% today. The expansion of mobile phone networks, alongside falling smartphone prices, have led to a similar increase in internet users across sub-Saharan Africa. “When more people are connected to the internet, they know what is out there,” he says. “It creates a lot of excitement and motivation.”

Wondim and her hydroponics start-up are a case in point. “Before I applied to blueMoon gas efficient cars 2010, I used to experiment watching YouTube and I came across this technology. I was really surprised that we can grow crops without soil,” she says. Taking this existing technology, Wondim then created a new business model – one moulded to Ethiopian society.

“The youth think that agriculture and farming is outdated, and are even abandoning their parents’ and grandparents’ land,” she explains. “If we make it more high-tech, we can promote the youth into that business.” GroHydro systems are also being designed for refugees in Ethiopia’s urban centres who are often marginalised. Not only does this empower refugees with an income, but Wondim hopes that through business a dialogue will be created between refugees and Ethiopians. “We need to start some kind of engagement,” she says.

Lemma points to a traditional crowd-saving practice electricity invented or discovered – called Equb – in which family members and friends regularly put money into a shared pot, and then wait their turn for the dividends. Recently this Ethiopian custom has been digitised into a mobile app. “You wouldn’t think about this in another market, unless you had that culture,” he says.

While Addis Ababa is teeming with innovative ideas like these, turning them into marketable products is an uphill struggle. For decades, Ethiopia’s business environment has remained conservative and bureaucratic. “Commercialisation for any business here is hard, but if you’re looking j gastrointest oncol impact factor at tech innovation, it’s way harder,” says Lemma. The procedure to open or close a new business is lengthy and expensive – the antithesis of the start-up model.

Yet the rapid liberalisation of Ethiopia’s economy carries with it the risk of neo-colonialism. Getnet Assefa, the co-founder of iCog Labs and an ardent support of many of Abiy’s reforms notes that most of the technology companies in Kenya and Nigeria are foreign-owned. “Yes, they have a lot of investment,” he says. “But if you look at it in terms of homegrown tech, Ethiopia is doing reasonably well.” Assefa believes the government must tread a line between encouraging foreign investment and fostering the growth of Ethiopian tech companies.

In July, Abiy met with Sophia the Robot, who was partly built at iCog Labs. “We programmed Sophia to speak a small amount of Amharic for the prime minister,” says Assefa. As much as Abiy’s appearance was a publicity stunt, it signalled his commitment to the technology sector. “People are now electricity voltage in canada seeing Ethiopia in a different eye, not just poverty and politics,” says Assefa.