Bbk mustang 78mm throttle intake 1780 (96-04 gt) – free shipping electricity notes physics

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Hey everyone, I’m Justin with AmericanMuscle.com, and today, I’m going to break down the BBK 78 mm throttle intake for all ’96-’04 Mustang GTs. This product from BBK combines two of their most popular items: the tried and true larger diameter BBK throttle body along with a very popular two-valve mod, the larger diameter intake elbow. This has combined it in one very sleek package that is a lot cheaper than ordering both products separately. Why would you want something like this versus your standard normal diameter throttle body? Well, as soon as you place a larger diameter throttle body on your stock intake plenum that is not port matched (meaning it is not matched to 78 mm), you’re instantly losing out on all that extra flow thanks to that larger throttle body. This kit from BBK takes care of all that. This throttle intake is offered in a massive 78 mm diameter, which will allow for maximum airflow. That’s also going to help with your looks under the hood as well, thanks to that very sleek black finish. That large diameter will be perfect for your forced induction setups, including superchargers or turbochargers when you have to move the absolute most amount of air through your motor. Installing this throttle intake for the first time is a relatively painless task that should only take a couple hours. You will need to transfer over both your intake air control valve and your TPS sensor from your stock unit over to the new BBK. After that, simply reinstall in reverse order, plug everything in, and you should be good to go. So if you’re looking to increase the airflow in your 2 valve 4-6, all the while increasing your throttle response and getting some big top-end gains, you’ll definitely want to check out this throttle intake from BBK Performance.

Pleased with the performance improvement and overall quality and ease of installation. As others have stated, it produces a slight whistle under certain throttle conditions. However, there were three annoying issues – two minor, and one major.

The first minor issue is the TPS bushing. It is not required on the 78mm model, but the instructions call for installation of the "included bushing." There is no included bushing. I had to call BBK tech support to clear that up. The instructions for a $300 part should be more clear.

The second minor issue is the fitting for the PCV breather hose. When you screw in the fitting, the hex portion that fits close to the throttle body interferes slightly with the IAC gasket. You have to trim a corner off the IAC gasket to get it to line up correctly. BBK could have moved the hole over just a hair to prevent that from happening. Possibly if you screw the fitting all the way down tight, it might clear, but the fitting is plastic and only so much torque can be applied. I didn’t think it was wise to tighten it down any more than I did.

The major issue was the throttle stop screw. The factory-installed loctite was insufficient to hold it in position. After about a week of driving with no issues, I suddenly got a high idle, consistently at 1,500 – 2,000 RPM, and once close to 4,000 after stopping at a stop light. The car was not drivable. It never occurred to me to check the throttle stop screw, because it had been secured in place with loctite, so I chased all the usual suspects implicated in a high idle situation – TPS, IAC, vacuum leak, etc. This took a week of fiddling around. By chance I happened to notice that the dab of loctite on the throttle stop screw and the corresponding dab on the throttle body itself didn’t align, and it was then I noticed that the screw had moved significantly towards the throttle bracket, holding open the throttle plate slightly, and causing the high idle. There was no loctite on the actual threads of the screw, only a dab on the outside. That’s not acceptable, particularly because the screw is very easy to turn (finger pressure will do it, no need for a tool) and just vibration from driving had caused it to advance and essentially hold the throttle partially open. That could result in a dangerous driving condition. I have since fixed the issue, but it should never have happened.