Beacon bulletin from a real p.i. for the legal community electricity physics formulas

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A recently published Popular Mechanics study concludes that, in an airplane crash, 69% of rear cabin passengers are more likely to survive than those in the front rows (generally the first and business classes or in all-coach flights, the first 15 rows). In the same situation, over the wing seat passengers experience a 59% survival rate, which then drops dramatically to 49% for those in the aforementioned front rows. Statistics show that the middle seats in the rear of an aircraft historically have the highest survival rates. (Bear in mind, however, that many factors are involved in aircraft mishaps that shape an incident; these statistics are based on otherwise “routine” flights in a standard design planes (rather than military or supersonic aircraft).

A railroad car or two ahead of the rear car is the safest seat on a passenger train. gas z factor According to the U.S. government’s transportation accident investigation authority, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB), a majority of passenger rail mishaps damage the front cars; secondly, the middle cars in derailment situations; with the least damage occurring to the near to end cars. Of course, in the case of a front to rear collision between two trains, the first train will suffer rear car damage, obviously, the first car(s) of the second train will suffer the most damage but these are the rarest collision types. Final tip: choose a rear facing seat (in the direction of travel). In a crash, you won’t be thrown forward. The safest cabin on a cruise ship:

From the Cruise Critic, the safest berths on a cruise ship are the mid to upper cabins, facing outward, in the ship’s aft (rear) section. Cruise line accidents, while extremely rare, tend to damage the hull (usually in the front part) first, thereby exposing the lower and inner cabins to immediate flooding as well as by positioning alone, these cabins have more restricted avenues of escape. Overall, we recommend staying away from any cruises along the Somalian coast, regardless of cabin choice.

The most recent statistics from the National Safety Council show that death by falling from a bed, chair or other furniture is almost as likely as death by air transport. f gas logo As of 2016, your odds of dying from an in-home fall are about 1 in 379,000 while your risk in an airplane is about 1 in 484,000. You are safer hurtling through the air at 530 mph in a metal container than you are standing on a chair in your own home reaching for a can of tuna.

The law sets forth requirements for state driver’s licenses and ID cards to be accepted by the federal government for “official purposes”, as defined by the Secretary of the United States Department of Homeland Security. The Secretary of Homeland Security has defined “official purposes” as boarding commercially operated airline flights, and entering federal buildings and nuclear power plants, although the law gives the Secretary the unlimited authority to require a “federal identification” for any other purposes. [4]

On December 20, 2013, the Department of Homeland Security announced that implementation of Phase 1 would begin on January 20, 2014, which followed a yearlong period of “deferred enforcement”. There are four planned phases, three of which apply to areas that affect relatively few U.S. citizens—e.g., DHS headquarters, nuclear power plants, and restricted and semi-restricted federal facilities such as military bases. [5] On January 8, 2016, DHS issued an implementation schedule for Phase 4, stating that starting January 22, 2018 “passengers with a driver’s license issued by a state that is still not compliant with the REAL ID Act (and has not been granted an extension) will need to show an alternative form of acceptable identification for domestic air travel to board their flight”. Starting October 1, 2020 “every air traveler will need a REAL ID-compliant license, or another acceptable form of identification, for domestic air travel.” [6] As of November 2018, 38 states and territories have been certified as compliant, and 18 have been granted extensions. [7]

The professional investigator should conduct an employment background check from an experience-based template, outlining his/her methodology. Aside from the consistency of results, wire-framing the investigation will ensure that the basics of a background check are researched and, serves as a solid springboard once the information pipeline begins to flow. Starting with the very first step – in all cases – from an entry level employee to a potential new partner, all references and work history should be verified.

5. gaslighting Develop the subject’s public and private profile. (There are many methods employed by professional detectives that will allow the investigator to acquire the comprehensive information necessary to develop a 360 degree assessment of the subject.) This is a critical part of checking the background of a potential partner. In today’s information age, no one can control all visible aspects of one’s life and there will be the inevitable professional and personal disclosures online. While no single posting (unless of course it’s of a truly damaging event), will reveal the subject’s true character, subsequent to assessing the all of the tangible search results, a pattern should become obvious to the investigator which will allow for an accurate analysis of the subject’s behavior. The past portends the future.

The above recommendations for employment consideration are, as the title states, the basics of a new hire/partner background check. Each industry – from transportation to healthcare – has in place employment policies specific to the field. By way of example, businesses involved in financial transactions – wherein the personal identifier information of a client may expose her to identity theft – may have to impose an extra layer of records protection to ensure that this information is not accessed or used in a fraudulent manner. (See the FTC Red Flag Laws.)

Wired, July 17,2018: Over the past two years, RealNetworks has developed a facial recognition tool that it hopes will help schools more accurately monitor who gets past their front doors. Today, the company launched a website where school administrators can download the tool, called SAFR, for free and integrate it with their own camera systems. So far, one school in Seattle is testing the tool and the state of Wyoming is designing a pilot program that could launch later this year.

One group in particular, the Electronic Frontier Foundation published a white paper outlining how facial recognition technology often misidentifies black people and women at a much higher rate than white males. (Let’s stay away from any racial debate and stick to the tech flaws that are currently embedded in the software that obviously needs major tweaking.) Amazon employees are strongly protesting the use of its FR product,, Rekognition for law enforcement purposes. Last week, Microsoft President Brad Smith called for federal regulation of facial recognition technology, writing, “This technology can catalog your photos, help reunite families or potentially be misused and abused by private companies and public authorities alike.”

Because lying is hard work. It requires activating different areas of the brain not normally in play during truthful storytelling, controlling one’s physical responses that lying normally elicits and being particularly attentive to the questions being asked. Fortunately, one of the most reliable methods of lie detection comes from the liar herself. electricity production in north korea Her words. Unless you are dealing with an out-and-out clinically pathological liar (and even they will trip up from time to time), it’s fairly simple to hang a liar by her own verbal statements.

• Liars will repeat a question verbatim. Hey Mike, did you send the email to Karen? Did I send the email to Karen? If this is Mike’s response, you have your answer—he didn’t send it yet. Repeating a question in full is a common stalling tactic used by people looking for an extra moment to prepare their lie. basic electricity quizlet In natural conversation, people will sometimes repeat part of a question, but restating the entire question is highly awkward and unnecessary—they clearly heard you the first time.

• Liars will take a guarded tone. If Mike had replied to the question by lowering his voice and asking, What do you mean?, a lie may well be in the processing of formation. A suspicious or guarded approach isn’t generally called for with a basic question, and the guarded tone taken may indicate that he’s concealing something—usually the truthful answer to your question.

• Liars won’t use contractions in their denials. Providing the classic example of what interrogators call “non-contracted denial” is Bill Clinton when he said “I did not have sexual relations with that woman.” The extra emphasis in the denial is unnecessary if someone is telling the truth. I didn’t have sex with her is how the honest person is likely to phrase his claim of innocence. gas jet Clinton said a lot more than he realized with his words.

• Liars tell stories in strict chronology. To keep their stories straight, liars tend to stick to exact chronological accounts when relating an event. They have enough to think about in creating the lie. But this isn’t how we ordinarily talk when being truthful. When recounting stories, honest people will tell them they way they remember the events – in emotional order rather than strict chronological order. Often we’ll start off with the most impactful emotional moment, and move around in time order to add details that are not in the primary recall.

• Liars love euphemisms. It’s human nature not to implicate ourselves in wrongdoing. grade 9 electricity formulas This holds especially true for liars, who will shy away from strict definitions of their actions, often opting for less harsh language, for example; instead of saying “I didn’t steal the purse” they may say “I didn’t take the purse.” If asked a direct question and your wording is modified/softened in the response, you are being lied to.

• Liars overemphasize their truthfulness. There’s no need to add modifiers such as “To tell you the truth…” “Honestly…” “I swear to you…” if you really are telling the truth. When people bolster their response with these type phrases, there’s a strong chance that they are hiding something or not telling the full truth. There’s no reason for the extraneous words.

• Liars give very specific denials. Liars tend to be very particular in what they say and don’t say. Truth-tellers have no problem issuing categorical denials— I never cheated anyone in my whole life—whereas the liar will choose his words ever so carefully – I never cheated on my husband during the period of our marriage. (Well, there’s the period of dating, engagement and separation and previous relationships that is not covered by that denial.)

• Liars hedge their statements. gas vs electric stove safety We hear them in court testimony, political speeches and interviews all the time: qualifying statements that give the person on the hot seat an “out” if their lie is uncovered. “As far as I know…” “If you really think about it…” “What I recall is…” Hedged statements should make the interviewer wonder when the other shoe will drop.

The best liespotting detector is, of course, yourself – the experienced interviewer. Very few people – statistically insignificant – can lie perfectly; giving a recall of the events in emotional (v. chronological) order, interjecting themselves directly into the lie and remember the non-existent details over an extended period of time. If they could, they’d be professional spies. Trust your instincts and listen very carefully to what is being said.

There are a few obvious signs that your cell phone is being monitored/tapped. (Bear in mind that some of these indicators can be caused by other factors so you need to use your judgment.) Some spy software works extremely well and in stealth mode for which you will need expert advice, but in general, below are indications that your phone may be tapped:

Odd Phone Behavior – Make note of odd changes in your cell phones behavior. Does it suddenly light up when not in use; make random beeping noises, shutdown by itself or exhibit any other random behavior? All phones can do strange things from time to time but if this is happening on a regular basis it could be a sign that your phone is being accessed by hidden software.

Battery Rundown – Some spyware apps can be a drain on your battery so look out for any sudden changes in your battery life such as it needs charging more often. Be aware that over time your cell phone battery life will diminish naturally, so you’re looking for any dramatic change. Some of the cheaper spy software programs will run your battery down quickly, however the more modern programs are designed to make less demand on the battery and are harder to identify.

Receiving Unusual Texts – Don’t dismiss strange text messages containing random numbers, symbols or characters? The remote control feature of spyware works by sending secret coded text messages to your phone and in some cases these can be seen – if the spyware is not working correctly. If this happens regularly you could have a spy app on your phone.

Increased data Usage – Noticed an increase in your normal data usage? Some of the less stable spy apps use extra data to send the information collected from your phone, so be on the lookout for any unexplained surge in your monthly data usage. There are several apps that can be used to monitor your data usage check out: My Data Manager – Android from Goggle Play, and Data Usage – for iPhone, available from the Apple Store. Again, with the best spy software programs data usage has been reduced and will be almost impossible to spot – but the poor programs will show significant data use.