Béarnaise sauce – simple english wikipedia, the free encyclopedia electricity nightcore lyrics

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Although a similar recipe was published in 1818, Béarnaise sauce was likely first created by the chef Collinet, [3] the inventor of puffed potatoes ( French: pommes de terre soufflées), and served at the 1836 opening of Le Pavillon Henri IV, a restaurant at Saint-Germain-en-Laye, not far from Paris. Evidence for this is reinforced by the fact that the restaurant was named for Henry IV of France, a gourmet himself, who was born in the former province of Béarn. [4] Preparation [ change | change source ]

The most common preparation is a Bain-marie method where a reduction of vinegar is used to acidify the yolks. Escoffier [1] calls for a reduction of wine, vinegar, shallots, fresh chervil, fresh tarragon and crushed peppercorns (later strained out), with fresh tarragon and chervil to finish instead of lemon juice. Others are similar. [6] Alternatively, the flavourings may be added to a finished Hollandaise ( sans lemon juice). Derivatives of Béarnaise sauce [ change | change source ]

Some assume Béarnaise refers to the Béarn region, a former province now in the département of Pyrénées-Atlantiques, in southwestern Franceto refer to the region of Béarn [4] However, the sauce has no tradition in the cooking of the area, and Larousse [12] has the name honouring Henri IV of France, a native of Béarn, and for whom the restaurant where the sauce was first shown was named. Henri IV was often known as le Grand Béarnais A la béarnaise [ change | change source ]

Some recipes are called à la béarnaise even when they are not accompanied by a Béarnaise sauce. This is because the recipes themselves are linked to the Béarn region. This added to confusion over the naming of the sauce. Notes [ change | change source ]

Although a similar recipe was published in 1818, Béarnaise sauce was likely first created by the chef Collinet, [3] the inventor of puffed potatoes ( French: pommes de terre soufflées), and served at the 1836 opening of Le Pavillon Henri IV, a restaurant at Saint-Germain-en-Laye, not far from Paris. Evidence for this is reinforced by the fact that the restaurant was named for Henry IV of France, a gourmet himself, who was born in the former province of Béarn. [4] Preparation [ change | change source ]

The most common preparation is a Bain-marie method where a reduction of vinegar is used to acidify the yolks. Escoffier [1] calls for a reduction of wine, vinegar, shallots, fresh chervil, fresh tarragon and crushed peppercorns (later strained out), with fresh tarragon and chervil to finish instead of lemon juice. Others are similar. [6] Alternatively, the flavourings may be added to a finished Hollandaise ( sans lemon juice). Derivatives of Béarnaise sauce [ change | change source ]

Some assume Béarnaise refers to the Béarn region, a former province now in the département of Pyrénées-Atlantiques, in southwestern Franceto refer to the region of Béarn [4] However, the sauce has no tradition in the cooking of the area, and Larousse [12] has the name honouring Henri IV of France, a native of Béarn, and for whom the restaurant where the sauce was first shown was named. Henri IV was often known as le Grand Béarnais A la béarnaise [ change | change source ]

Some recipes are called à la béarnaise even when they are not accompanied by a Béarnaise sauce. This is because the recipes themselves are linked to the Béarn region. This added to confusion over the naming of the sauce. Notes [ change | change source ]