Benjamin fortitude after-market modifications electricity hair stand up

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Back in my youth I hunted squirrels with an old Diana .22 break-barrel air rifle, so the technological advances in present-day air rifle design are truly impressive, when compared to the old-school single-shot spring-piston Diana air rifle I owned as a kid. Cutting to the chase I have fired nearly a thousand pellets with my Gamo Swarm rifle in my backyard 35-yard range, and have so enjoyed the accuracy of the gun, and its ten-round rapid-reload feature, that I started thinking of acquiring an "entry level" PCP rifle as well.

Now that I’ve been bitten by the modern air rifle bug, I found myself window shopping online for a PCP bolt-action repeater that was light-weight, accurate, regulated, and also capable of delivering 70 or more shots per refill. The Bernjamin Fortitude, released very recently in August 2018, ticks all the boxes for me, and I plan to get one, but only after waiting until a couple of well-known design bugs are resolved by Crosman, in future production runs of this beautiful, sleek and traditional looking air rifle.

Selling at $300, which I understand is the low end of PCP air rifle pricing, the Benjamin Fortitude weighs a mere 5.3 pounds without a scope, and that appealed to me a lot, since I do intend to do some small game hunting that will entail carrying the rifle about on longer walks. There are three primary complaints I have read online, expressed by some of those who have bought and tested the Benjamin Fortitude. storing electricity in water First, it evidently takes a lot of effort to pull back the bolt for each pellet reload. Secondly, the air tank has been reported to develop leakages whilst still new, by several users of this gun, and finally the trigger pull, at 5 to 7 pounds, is very heavy.

I just stumbled on this Youtube video by an outfit called Jefferson State Air Rifles, who sell upgrade replacement parts for various air rifles, and they offer an upgrade that reduces the trigger pull to less than 2 pounds, enables the bolt to be operated with ease, and increases the muzzle velocity from 750 to 850 fps. Checked their website for pricing, but this upgrade hasn’t yet made it to their price list, possibly on account of being a work in progress thus far.

While I bide my time before acquiring a .22 Benjamin Fortitude, keeping an eye out for further user reviews about the Benjamin Fortitude, I thought I might as well ask about this make and model PCP air rifle in forums such as this one, that are dedicated to the subject of air gun shooting sports. I would therefore be very appreciative of any reviews that can be offered here, on the Bernjamin Fortitude, and of course I would be in luck if I learn here that modifications for this brand-new design are on sale by other vendors in addition to the ones shown in the above video. That’ll be enough rambling from me, ha ha, and I look forward to hearing from anyone who has had the chance to use the Benjamin Fortitude PCP air rifle, or who knows of a source for after-market performance modification parts that could be swapped in by punters with little or no gun-smith training, like myself.

Back in my youth I hunted squirrels with an old Diana .22 break-barrel air rifle, so the technological advances in present-day air rifle design are truly impressive, when compared to the old-school single-shot spring-piston Diana air rifle I owned as a kid. Cutting to the chase I have fired nearly a thousand pellets with my Gamo Swarm rifle in my backyard 35-yard range, and have so enjoyed the accuracy of the gun, and its ten-round rapid-reload feature, that I started thinking of acquiring an "entry level" PCP rifle as well.

Now that I’ve been bitten by the modern air rifle bug, I found myself window shopping online for a PCP bolt-action repeater that was light-weight, accurate, regulated, and also capable of delivering 70 or more shots per refill. 9gag wiki The Bernjamin Fortitude, released very recently in August 2018, ticks all the boxes for me, and I plan to get one, but only after waiting until a couple of well-known design bugs are resolved by Crosman, in future production runs of this beautiful, sleek and traditional looking air rifle.

Selling at $300, which I understand is the low end of PCP air rifle pricing, the Benjamin Fortitude weighs a mere 5.3 pounds without a scope, and that appealed to me a lot, since I do intend to do some small game hunting that will entail carrying the rifle about on longer walks. There are three primary complaints I have read online, expressed by some of those who have bought and tested the Benjamin Fortitude. First, it evidently takes a lot of effort to pull back the bolt for each pellet reload. Secondly, the air tank has been reported to develop leakages whilst still new, by several users of this gun, and finally the trigger pull, at 5 to 7 pounds, is very heavy.

I just stumbled on this Youtube video by an outfit called Jefferson State Air Rifles, who sell upgrade replacement parts for various air rifles, and they offer an upgrade that reduces the trigger pull to less than 2 pounds, enables the bolt to be operated with ease, and increases the muzzle velocity from 750 to 850 fps. Checked their website for pricing, but this upgrade hasn’t yet made it to their price list, possibly on account of being a work in progress thus far.

While I bide my time before acquiring a .22 Benjamin Fortitude, keeping an eye out for further user reviews about the Benjamin Fortitude, I thought I might as well ask about this make and model PCP air rifle in forums such as this one, that are dedicated to the subject of air gun shooting sports. I would therefore be very appreciative of any reviews that can be offered here, on the Bernjamin Fortitude, and of course I would be in luck if I learn here that modifications for this brand-new design are on sale by other vendors in addition to the ones shown in the above video. That’ll be enough rambling from me, ha ha, and I look forward to hearing from anyone who has had the chance to use the Benjamin Fortitude PCP air rifle, or who knows of a source for after-market performance modification parts that could be swapped in by punters with little or no gun-smith training, like myself.Hi Muttley , welcome .

Hello Kelly and thanks for this reminder that shooting sports never have been the preserve of men. By the way the H&K MP5 replica, fitted with moderator no less, as shown with your signature, is one fearsome looking creation that is so indistinguishable from the powder-burning 9mm version, that it could fool even a trained eye. Gunsmith work is a very exacting science with hardly any margin for error, so my hat is off to you for installing the mods shown in the above picture. I wish there were drop-in valves and such that air-gun novices like me could DIY to boost fps, but on second thoughts I’d be hesitant to fire any gun assembled by me ha ha.

For my intended small game hunting purposes, the main selling point of the Benjamin Fortitude is of course the ten round multi-shot capability to make swifter those follow-up shots, the comparatively light weight that matters more on the longer walks I sometimes take, along with an advertised 70 shots per refill for the Benjamin Fortitude, where the Beeman QB specifies a maximum of 50 shots per refill.

All the same, if my patience waiting for the Benjamin Fortitude’s expected bug-fixes is not rewarded soon with the release of a new improved version, the Beeman QB is a strong contender I will keep in mind, though I confess I quickly got used to the convenience of having a multi-shot, ten-shot magazine air rifle, thanks to the Gamo Swarm Maxxim I recently bought as my first foray into the world of modern air rifles.

Come to think of it, my Gamo Swarm is a handy small game and vermin hunter, so it it safe to say that I have been bitten by the air rifle bug, as I window shop for an entry-level PCP gun. That said, my ideal air rifle collection would comprise of just two models, both in 22 caliber, namely the Gamo Swarm Maxxim that I recently bought, and the Benjamin Fortitude that I hope to own soon, all else being equal.

Hello Kelly and thanks for this reminder that shooting sports never have been the preserve of men. npower electricity meter reading By the way the H&K MP5 replica, fitted with moderator no less, as shown with your signature, is one fearsome looking creation that is so indistinguishable from the powder-burning 9mm version, that it could fool even a trained eye. Gunsmith work is a very exacting science with hardly any margin for error, so my hat is off to you for installing the mods shown in the above picture. I wish there were drop-in valves and such that air-gun novices like me could DIY to boost fps, but on second thoughts I’d be hesitant to fire any gun assembled by me ha ha.

For my intended small game hunting purposes, the main selling point of the Benjamin Fortitude is of course the ten round multi-shot capability to make swifter those follow-up shots, the comparatively light weight that matters more on the longer walks I sometimes take, along with an advertised 70 shots per refill for the Benjamin Fortitude, where the Beeman QB specifies a maximum of 50 shots per refill.

All the same, if my patience waiting for the Benjamin Fortitude’s expected bug-fixes is not rewarded soon with the release of a new improved version, the Beeman QB is a strong contender I will keep in mind, though I confess I quickly got used to the convenience of having a multi-shot, ten-shot magazine air rifle, thanks to the Gamo Swarm Maxxim I recently bought as my first foray into the world of modern air rifles.

Come to think of it, my Gamo Swarm is a handy small game and vermin hunter, so it it safe to say that I have been bitten by the air rifle bug, as I window shop for an entry-level PCP gun. electricity lessons 4th grade That said, my ideal air rifle collection would comprise of just two models, both in 22 caliber, namely the Gamo Swarm Maxxim that I recently bought, and the Benjamin Fortitude that I hope to own soon, all else being equal.Hi again , and thanks , yes H & K all day 🙂

These pointers are very much appreciated, Kelly. I started out fixated on the Benjamin Fortitude, with an almost tunnel-vision disregard of all other alternative brand names, but reading these posts you have been kind enough to share on the subject, my horizons are now broader, thanks to the mention of the Beeman QB Chief, and the Diana Stormrider, both of which I had ignored in my earlier research into entry level PCP airguns.

If you don’t mind my asking, did you acquire your gunsmith skills by way of professional training, or is it indeed possible to assimilate air-gun modification knowledge from books or online tutorials on the subject ? I would never attempt to carry out any mechanical alteration of a real, powder-burning firearm, but the thought did cross my mind that air-rifles might be a less perilous platform on which to experiment, perhaps later on when I have read up sufficiently on the subject.Hi , no worries about sharing what I know that is available on the market for entry level PCP stuff . That’s what we do here is help each other 🙂

I sure do appreciate the pointers you have been kind enough to share here, Kelly. When I first spotted the newly released Benjamin Fortitude PCP gun, I posted my initial inquiry in a total of three air-gun online forums, but in the other two forums, my questions didn’t attract much attention, and were soon buried under more recent topics, leaving me none the wiser.

I looked up Lassen County Community College, just out of curiosity, and saw that the gunsmith program there is described as one of the oldest in the entire country, so you did make a very prudent choice in earning your credentials there. Now I understand that your working knowledge of firearms in general, is far more detailed than anyone could amass by going the hobbyist route. I’ll try not to bore y’all with too many questions, so I don’t wear out my welcome here, but that said, I feel a bit more confident that if I ever get out of my depth with regards to any air rifle technology that I encounter, there is a very knowledgeable authority on the subject that I can consult.

My modest collection of powder burners comprises a well-worn Winchester Model 1200 shotgun for upland wing shooting, an identical Winchester 1200 fitted with a rifled barrel to launch slugs for deer hunting, and a Steyr Pro Hunter rifle chambered in 308, also for deer. Hope the mods won’t mind my straying off topic for a moment. Once again I thank you kindly for the educative responses that will certainly guide my air rifle search and purchase.

I sure do appreciate the pointers you have been kind enough to share here, Kelly. When I first spotted the newly released Benjamin Fortitude PCP gun, I posted my initial inquiry in a total of three air-gun online forums, but in the other two forums, my questions didn’t attract much attention, and were soon buried under more recent topics, leaving me none the wiser.

I looked up Lassen County Community College, just out of curiosity, and saw that the gunsmith program there is described as one of the oldest in the entire country, so you did make a very prudent choice in earning your credentials there. Now I understand that your working knowledge of firearms in general, is far more detailed than anyone could amass by going the hobbyist route. electricity kwh calculator I’ll try not to bore y’all with too many questions, so I don’t wear out my welcome here, but that said, I feel a bit more confident that if I ever get out of my depth with regards to any air rifle technology that I encounter, there is a very knowledgeable authority on the subject that I can consult.

My modest collection of powder burners comprises a well-worn Winchester Model 1200 shotgun for upland wing shooting, an identical Winchester 1200 fitted with a rifled barrel to launch slugs for deer hunting, and a Steyr Pro Hunter rifle chambered in 308, also for deer. Hope the mods won’t mind my straying off topic for a moment. Once again I thank you kindly for the educative responses that will certainly guide my air rifle search and purchase.