Best airline credit cards of 2018 – nerdwallet gas stoichiometry calculator

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Free checked bags are a valuable and common benefit for airline co-branded cards — and their biggest advantage over general-purpose travel cards (cards whose rewards can be used for any travel purchase). Delta blows away the competition for the sheer number of people on your itinerary who can check their first bag for free: up to nine. The comparable card from American Airlines allows five, and United allows just two. Of course, the best carrier for checked bags is Southwest Airlines, which allows all passengers to check two bags for free. But its credit cards don’t offer additional checked baggage benefits.

Besides free checked bags, cardholders get priority boarding and discounted lounge access. The card pays 2 miles per $1 spent on Delta purchases and 1 mile per dollar on everything else. Plus, it offers a sign-up bonus: Earn 30,000 Bonus Miles after spending $1,000 in purchases in the first 3 months and a $50 statement credit after making a Delta purchase in the first 3 months with your new Card. Terms Apply.

You earn an unlimited 2% back in TravelBank cash per $1 spent on United airline tickets and 1.5% back on other purchases. You also get 25% back as a statement credit on food and beverage purchases on United flights. Redeem $1 in TravelBank cash for $1 toward a United ticket — no fussing with award seat availability or blackout dates. There’s also a decent sign-up bonus. Drawbacks

You won’t receive free checked bags or priority boarding with this card — or any no-fee airline card. Your rewards also aren’t part of the regular United MileagePlus frequent-flyer program, so there’s no chance for scoring outsized value when redeeming them. And unlike general travel cards, you can spend your rewards on United flights only. Bottom Line

You won’t get the robust airline perks featured by higher tier airline cards with annual fees, but United packs considerable value into its no-fee card aimed at leisure travelers. It has an easy-to-understand loyalty program with healthy rewards on non-United purchases and no foreign transaction fees.

The first step in choosing an airline credit card is determining whether an airline card even makes sense for you, especially compared with a general travel credit card whose rewards aren’t tied to a specific carrier. An airline card can be a good choice if you regularly fly the same airline and do so often enough that the benefits you get from the card justify the annual fee.

The more you fly a particular airline, the more able you are to rack up enough miles for a free flight or seat upgrade and use those rewards for a flight you want. Checked bags are a big consideration because most major airline cards include a checked bag fee waiver, which can be valuable and quickly make up for the annual fee.

If you fly mostly one airline, choose a card from that carrier. If you regularly fly a couple of airlines, you might even consider getting cards for both. In choosing among a major airline’s credit cards, a primary differentiator is airport lounge access. If you think lounge access is worth it, get the premium card but be prepared to absorb a hefty annual fee. Beware that a lower-tier, no-fee airline card might not include free checked bags.

Make sure to link your airline card with your frequent-flyer account — that’s how some airlines determine whether you qualify for free checked bags. And with some airlines, notably United Airlines and JetBlue Airways, you must use your airline card to pay for your tickets in order to qualify for free checked bags.

Many airline cards have no foreign transaction fees, so can be a good choice to use while traveling abroad. Because airline cards typically give you accelerated rewards for airline purchases — often 2 miles or more per dollar spent — use the card for airfare, in-flight purchases and other airline-related expenses. More generally, optimize your card by learning not only all its features but also details of the frequent-flyer program it’s linked to.

Travel enthusiasts have multiple options besides airline cards, notably general travel credit cards. These cards provide travel rewards without tying you to a single airline. Their rewards usually apply to a wide range of travel-related expenses. And general travel cards tend to be simpler than airline-specific credit cards. So if you spread your flying among several airlines or don’t fly that much, a general travel card may be a better choice than an airline card.

You might not need a travel card at all, if a different kind of rewards credit card is a better fit. Indeed, a 2016 NerdWallet study found that most people — including many travelers — would get more in rewards with a cash-back card than with any travel credit card.