Big black bear attack! culture of life news gas vs electric oven

We have permission to shoot bears after three bears attacked us last year. They busted up my fence in several places, crashing through. Back then, I was without a dog so I barked at the bears which sent them away. Today, the son of the bear bitch who came last year stopped in to visit us. This time, we used a .22 to get him moving along.

Then we also had Sparky, the Austrian Haflinger stallion. He could chase off multiple bears, he was brave, strong and had sharp, big hooves and loved to fight. But this story illustrates why we have guns. We have no police out here in the countryside.

People who live in cities think weapons are evil and they are evil in the hands of criminals, goof-offs, foolish people, jealous people, and so forth. But living in the countryside, we use guns as tools and use them fairly frequently, not just for hunting.

This are tools just like trucks, which can be used in terror attacks, are tools. And knives are tools and can be used to kill many people. This is the price we pay for living on this planet. We live with governments that have nuclear arsenals and many weapons and these are used stupidly way too often.

The story, by the way, that Assad stupidly used ‘gas bombs’ on ‘civilians’ has been shown to be a total hoax created by people who hate Assad and lies about this matter were used to scare Trump and the US public into supporting an illegal attack on Syria.

Sigh. More war crimes and a grave misuse of weapons. The bear really was going to attack us, he went all the way around my 6 foot tall fence to find the only gate that was open and entered it and was walking straight towards me when we shot at him.

Or maybe trophy hunting is a way that some people strain to resolve the tension between their own subjective sense of alienation from nature, and their deeper, underlying bond with not only nature, but more specifically with other animal species, especially mammalian ones, which can never be fully lost– even among the most “civilized” of us. That trophy hunters should be mostly men also isn’t surprising, given that the male psyche, for both better and worse, seems more prone to the type of detachment from body and nature that then feels compelled to resolve itself in this manner. That’s in addition to all of the atavistic instincts that can fuel the male psyche, of course. But these same atavistic instincts can also fuel a nostalgia of longing to reestablish our seemingly lost bond with nature, and which can at the same time distort and pervert the means by which we do so.

As a side note, the hunters whom I know all abide by the “if you kill it, eat it” ethic, and share a basic contempt for trophy collectors, a principle which can extend to the fate of nations: http://bigthink.com/paul-ratner/the-crazy-story-of-how-archduke-franz-ferdinand-personally-killed-almost-300000-animals

Oddly enough, my own experience with black bears is that it’s the largest ones who are the most timid in the face of human encounters, and who will bolt the moment they see you. Maybe that’s how they grew up to be large in the first place 🙂 But as the current jargon has it, YMMV.

I don’t know. I guess if someone wants to spend $35,000 to go to Africa and hunt a Cape Buffalo or a Lion, that’s fine. First off, how many people actually have that kind of money to blow on Hunting trips? And if part of that hunting fee goes to Conservation, the net result is a good one. And in the US, hunters pay outrageous amounts of money bidding on the right to hunt for Bighorn sheep. The videos can make hunting seem a little bloodthirsty, but we are all bloodthirsty when you think about it. I always remember this line about hunting versus not hunting. The anti hunter always makes the claim at how unfair hunting is by asking, “So what kind of a gun does a Deer/Elf/Bear, etc., use to defend itself (against hunters)? The hunter’s answer? “The same one a Cow/Chicken/Pig uses! Before ya grill it, ya gotta kill it and if the animal lovers want something to REALLY protest against as far as cruelty to animals, they ought to check out the ways animals are butchered in meat processing plants.

World famous wildlife biologist Vince Crichton was renowned for his encyclopedic knowledge of moose. Early in his career he conducted moose surveys, where they would tranquilize a moose from helicopter, land, then conduct the survey while the moose was incapacitated.

Once the survey was complete with animal measurements, blood sample, tagging etc., Vince would wait until the animal was recovering, and as it rose he would leap upon its back. The moose would invariably depart in a gallop heading for the nearest tree to knock this interloper off of its back! I met Vince in the ’90’s and viewed many videos of Vince doing this and many times he suffered a few bruises in the process, including being knocked off by a stout tree branch. 🙂

The most dramatic video was taken when Vince was in vicinity of a cow with calf. The cow became nervous with his proximity and attacked him. Seeing a 400 pound animal repeatedly pound a man into the bog with its hooves was horrific: Vince’s back later was one huge, continuous bruise. The only thing that prevented the cow from killing him was the bog-swamp terrain which permitted the animal to drive Vince through the spongy surface, thus absorbing some energy from the blows.