Billionaire tom steyer gets michigan renewable energy deal – naples herald gas bubble in back

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Steyer called the deal a “win for the people of Michigan,” adding that “every American deserves the right to clean air and water.” Steyer has been on a mission to impeach President Donald Trump, and his NextGen America group also is backing renewable energy ballot drives in Arizona and Nevada. In 2012, Michigan voters rejected a proposed constitutional amendment that would have required electricity suppliers to generate 25 percent of their power from wind, solar, biomass or hydropower by 2025.

Earlier this year, Jackson-based Consumers announced it would phase out electricity production from coal by 2040 to slash emissions of heat-trapping gases that cause global warming. The utility said it would generate 40 percent of its power from renewable sources such as wind and solar energy by then.

Detroit-based DTE last year pledged a carbon emissions cut of more than 80 percent by 2050 by phasing out coal, boosting wind and solar energy, and building a 1,100-megawatt natural gas plant. The Michigan Public Service Commission OK’d the new plant in April.

The 2016 energy laws set a non-binding goal of meeting 35 percent of Michigan’s power needs by 2025 through a combination of renewable energy and energy conservation. Consumers and DTE now will target a 50 percent clean energy goal by 2030 — half from renewable energy and half from an energy waste reduction benchmark.

Michigan Environmental Council President Chris Kolb, whose group intervenes in regulatory proceedings, called the announcement a “big step forward” and said the organization “will do everything in our power to ensure this commitment is fully implemented and the benefits to our state are fully maximized.”

Steyer called the deal a “win for the people of Michigan,” adding that “every American deserves the right to clean air and water.” Steyer has been on a mission to impeach President Donald Trump, and his NextGen America group also is backing renewable energy ballot drives in Arizona and Nevada. In 2012, Michigan voters rejected a proposed constitutional amendment that would have required electricity suppliers to generate 25 percent of their power from wind, solar, biomass or hydropower by 2025.

Earlier this year, Jackson-based Consumers announced it would phase out electricity production from coal by 2040 to slash emissions of heat-trapping gases that cause global warming. The utility said it would generate 40 percent of its power from renewable sources such as wind and solar energy by then.

Detroit-based DTE last year pledged a carbon emissions cut of more than 80 percent by 2050 by phasing out coal, boosting wind and solar energy, and building a 1,100-megawatt natural gas plant. The Michigan Public Service Commission OK’d the new plant in April.

The 2016 energy laws set a non-binding goal of meeting 35 percent of Michigan’s power needs by 2025 through a combination of renewable energy and energy conservation. Consumers and DTE now will target a 50 percent clean energy goal by 2030 — half from renewable energy and half from an energy waste reduction benchmark.

Michigan Environmental Council President Chris Kolb, whose group intervenes in regulatory proceedings, called the announcement a “big step forward” and said the organization “will do everything in our power to ensure this commitment is fully implemented and the benefits to our state are fully maximized.”