Brand new civic 1.5 sport sluggish page 4 2016+ honda civic forum (10th gen) – type r forum, si forum – civicx.com gas pump heaven

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Hi guys. I just recently purchased a brand new civic 1.5 sports hatch with cvt to use as a daily and I despise driving this car ever since I drove it off the showroom floor. I was wondering if anyone can shed some light because I refuse to believe honda put out such a terrible driving car. I am thinking honda sold me a faulty car? Is that even such a thing?? You would expect a brand new car to have zero issues.

The best way I can describe the car gas welder job description, it feels like I am driving a car with the wastegate stuck partially open. The throttle is extremely laggy and heavy sensation with almost zero throttle response. Taking off from the lights feels like im dragging an anchor and the car wont reach full boost or power unless I gradually roll on the power as opposed to mashing the gas. Its like the car is limiting power and torque from the dig until I reach 60kmh. But here z gastroenterol journal is the strange thing, the car intermittently will suddenly become responsive with much faster turbo spool and will last usually for about 20 minutes before it goes back to being sluggish and not boosting correctly.

Click to expand…Funny… they ought to know how to fix this. Still… it should be pretty well air tight from intake to the end of the exhaust gas mask drawing pipe. Only vent point I can thing of would be the bypass valve which can vent or recirculate as I understand it. I’ve had/fixed piles of boost leaks on my old Z cars. I’ve attached a link for the best write up on boost leaks from my Z32. While it’s relatively specific to that electricity bill car and it’s 21 feet of intake piping… the process of removing the airbox, installing a blank with a fitting and pressurizing the ducting would all be the same.

The whole, there’s some leak coming from the car and we don’t know is kind of piss poor of their part. You should, however, be running rich if the air passing the MAF sensor… but then not making it in the engine if it’s leaking out. You would also see it as low boost pressure. The pressurized intake ducting should only depressurize through what gas x strips instructions will slowly pass by the otherwise-shut throttle body.

As to it being on the exhaust side… I suppose you could Jerry rig some sort of cover out of tape on the end of the exhaust pipe… and pressurize the exhaust side… It’s pressurize through the exhaust… turbo… into any open exhaust valves… combustion chamber, against what should be a shut intake valve… but that should be it I think. In the end… again, you’d get it pressurized. Either way… you could find it. I’ve never tried to pressurize the exhaust side… but I don’t think I’m missing anything. If there was a leak… well… you’d have an exhaust leak. The question electricity facts comes into play if there’s an exhaust leak making the turbine side not do the amount of work it should be doing so it’s spinning slow or barely at all and not compressing the air on the intake side so you have no/little boost. The leak would get worse the harder you push the car because you’d have more gas escaping.

Funny… they ought to know how to fix this. Still… it should be pretty well air tight from intake to the end of the exhaust pipe. Only vent point I can thing of would be the bypass valve which can vent or recirculate as I understand it. I’ve had/fixed piles of boost leaks on my old Z cars. I’ve attached a link for the best write up on boost leaks 5 gases found in the environment from my Z32. While gas questions it’s relatively specific to that car and it’s 21 feet of intake piping… the process of removing the airbox, installing a blank with a fitting and pressurizing the ducting would all be the same.

The whole, there’s some leak coming from the car and we don’t know is kind of piss poor of their part. You should, however, be running rich if the air passing the MAF sensor… but then not making it in the engine if it’s leaking out. You would also see it as low boost pressure. The pressurized intake ducting should only depressurize through electricity quiz 4th grade what will slowly pass by the otherwise-shut throttle body.

As to it being on the exhaust side… I suppose you could Jerry rig some sort of cover out of tape on the end of the exhaust pipe… and pressurize the exhaust side… It’s pressurize through the exhaust… turbo… into any open exhaust valves… combustion chamber, against what should be a shut intake valve… but that should be it I think. In the end… again, you’d get it pressurized. Either way… you could find it. I’ve never tried to pressurize the exhaust side… but I don electricity projects ks2’t think I’m missing anything. If there was a leak… well… you’d have an exhaust leak. The question comes into play if there’s an exhaust leak making the turbine side not do the amount of work it should be doing so it’s spinning slow or barely at all and not compressing the air on the intake side so you have no/little boost. The leak would get worse the harder you push the car because you’d have more gas escaping.

Intercooler clamps could do it. As the pressure builds in the duct, while the hard pipes would be fine, rubber hoses will expand slightly. What won’t cause a vacuum leak on idle (sucking in on the rubber) or light boost can electricity and water show up on heavy boost. You can hit a threshold where you boost peaks at a low value, but that air us still passing by the MAF near the airbox so you go rich. And, agreed… loose airbox cover shouldn’t contribute to that issue. It’s upstream the MAF and not pressurized either.

It would have shown as an air leak if a boost leak test was performed. I’ve had to correct several leaks over the years. The knowledge was gained by others hard work and sharing with kd 7 electricity socks me and the experience earned by pressurizing tract… tighten this… tighten that…. repressurize… listen… tighten this… tighten that… again and again. I’m always happy to share. Boost leaks can make a good car feel broke and many times are fixed by just a tug on a hose and turning a hose clamp screw an extra half turn electricity manipulation.

Really though… the idea the mechanics initial reaction is, big air leak… don’t know how to fix it doesn’t say much for them. You might want to find a better group of mechanics. Boost leaks go with turbos like… well… I can’t think of a good analogy, but if you have a turbo car long enough… swap parts… it ages… it’ll happen eventually.