Breakdown of electricity generation by energy source the shift project data portal 10 gases and their uses

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Renewable energy represents the energy resources that are naturally replenishing but flow-limited. They are virtually inexhaustible in duration but limited in the amount of energy that is available per unit of time. Renewable energy resources include: hydro (conventional hydroelectric power), geothermal, solar, tidal action, ocean thermal, wave action, wind and biomass.

Hydroelectric pumped storage represents the hydroelectricity that is generated during peak loads by using water previously pumped into an elevated storage reservoir during off-peak periods when excess generating capacity is available to do so. When additional generating capacity is needed, the water can be released from the reservoir through a conduit to turbine generators located in a power plant at a lower level. In the hydroelectric pumped storage calculation, we consider the pumped storage facility production minus the energy used for pumping.

Hydroelectricity represents the electricity generated by an electric power plant whose turbines are driven by falling water. It includes electric utility and industrial generation of hydroelectricity, unless otherwise specified. Generation is reported on a net basis, i. e., on the amount of electric energy generated after the electric energy consumed by station auxiliaries and the losses in the transformers that are considered integral parts of the station are deducted.

Decomposition of the conventional thermal energy as oil, gas and coal is calculated with the data from World Bank database. The percentages of oil/gas/coal in World Bank data is applied to the data from U.S. Energy Information Administration. And for the year 2011 we will use the same percentage of 2010.

I have recently been using your data portal to increase my understanding of world and national energy data and have learnt a lot. I remain puzzled, however, by what appears to me to be inconsistent presentations of electricity production data. Whereas the differentiation between nuclear thermal and nuclear electricity, for example, is clear, it is not so for the conventional. I find your sentence "Conventional thermal electricity represents the electricity generated by an electric power plant using coal, petroleum, or gas as its source of energy" somewhat unclear: do the given numbers represent the TWh of electricity, or the TWh of thermal. One would expect the thermal numbers to be about three times higher than the electricity numbers, but when I convert the coal TWh values to the equivalent in MTOE, and compare those numbers with the MTOE values of general energy consumption, they do not compare well – for example it looks as if German coal-fired power plants have an efficiency of about 40% which would be rather remarkable. Can you explain, please?

I have recently been using your data portal to increase my understanding of world and national energy data and have learnt a lot. I remain puzzled, however, by what appears to me to be inconsistent presentations of electricity production data. Whereas the differentiation between nuclear thermal and nuclear electricity, for example, is clear, it is not so for the conventional. I find your sentence "Conventional thermal electricity represents the electricity generated by an electric power plant using coal, petroleum, or gas as its source of energy" somewhat unclear: do the given numbers represent the TWh of electricity, or the TWh of thermal. One would expect the thermal numbers to be about three times higher than the electricity numbers, but when I convert the coal TWh values to the equivalent in MTOE, and compare those numbers with the MTOE values of general energy consumption, they do not compare well – for example it looks as if German coal-fired power plants have an efficiency of about 40% which would be rather remarkable. Can you explain, please?