Build node.js apps with vs code gas 10 ethanol

To get started in this walkthrough, install Node.js for your platform. The Node Package Manager is included in the Node.js distribution. You’ll need to open a new terminal (command prompt) for the node and npm command line tools to be on your PATH.

You can now click Debug tool bar green arrow or press F5 to launch and debug "Hello World". Your breakpoint will be hit and you can view and step through the simple application. Notice that VS Code displays a different colored Status Bar to indicate it is in Debug mode and the DEBUG CONSOLE is displayed.

Express is a very popular application framework for building and running Node.js applications. You can scaffold (create) a new Express application using the Express Generator tool. The Express Generator is shipped as an NPM module and installed by using the NPM command line tool npm.

The Node.js and Express documentation does a great job explaining how to build rich applications using the platform and framework. Visual Studio Code will make you more productive developing these types of applications by providing great code editing and navigation experiences.

Open the file app.js and hover over the Node.js global object __dirname. Notice how VS Code understands that __dirname is a string. Even more interesting, you can get full IntelliSense against the Node.js framework. For example, you can require http and get full IntelliSense against the http class as you type in Visual Studio Code.

VS Code uses TypeScript type declaration (typings) files (for example node.d.ts) to provide metadata to VS Code about the JavaScript based frameworks you are consuming in your application. Type declaration files are written in TypeScript so they can express the data types of parameters and functions, allowing VS Code to provide a rich IntelliSense experience. Thanks to a feature called Automatic Type Acquisition, you do not have to worry about downloading these type declaration files, VS Code will install them automatically for you.

You can also write code that references modules in other files. For example, in app.js we require the ./routes/index module, which exports an Express.Router class. If you bring up IntelliSense on index, you can see the shape of the Router class.

You will need to create a debugger configuration file launch.json for your Express application. Click on the Debug icon in the Activity Bar and then the Configure gear icon at the top of the Debug view to create a default launch.json file. Select the Node.js environment by ensuring that the type property in configurations is set to "node". When the file is first created, VS Code will look in package.json for a start script and will use that value as the program (which in this case is "${workspaceFolder}\\bin\\www) for the Launch Program configuration. {

Save the new file and make sure Launch Program is selected in the configuration dropdown at the top of the Debug view. Open app.js and set a breakpoint near the top of the file where the Express app object is created by clicking in the gutter to the left of the line number. Press F5 to start debugging the application. VS Code will start the server in a new terminal and hit the breakpoint we set. From there you can inspect variables, create watches, and step through your code.