Building extensions for vs code jokes gas prices

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If you are interested in extending VS Code, you are in the right place. Here we present an outline of the VS Code extensibility documentation and how to quickly build your first VS Code extension. If you’re curious about our design approach to extensibility for VS Code, you can read about it here.

All VS Code extensions share a common model of contribution (registration), activation (loading) and access to the VS Code extensibility API. There are however two special flavors of VS Code extensions, language servers and debuggers, which have their own additional protocols and are covered in their own sections of the documentation.

Language servers let you create a dedicated process for your extension. This is a useful design choice for your extension when your extension runs high cost CPU or IO intensive tasks which could slow other extensions. This is common for tasks that work across all files in a workspace e.g. linters or static analysis suites.

VS Code implements a generic debugger UI and relies on debugger extensions and so called "debug adapters" to connect the debug UI to a real debugger or runtime. A debug adapter is a dedicated process that communicates with VS Code through the VS Code Debug Protocol and can be implemented in any language.

The easiest way to see VS Code extensions in action is via the Extension Marketplace. You can browse for useful extensions, install them to try them out and get an idea how you might extend VS Code for your own development scenarios. Language Extension Guidelines

The Language Extension Guidelines topic can help you to decide what language features you’d like to support with your extension. It shows the various language features available in VS Code (for example, code suggestions and actions, formatting, renaming) and how to implement them through either the language server protocol or by using the extensibility API directly from your extension. Themes, Snippets, and Colorizers

You can have a great editing experience for your programming language with simple things such as syntax highlighting, useful snippets, and a well designed color theme. TextMate customization files provide this support and VS Code lets you easily package and reuse these so you can directly use .tmTheme, .tmSnippets, and .tmLanguage files in your extension. Our Themes, Snippets, and Colorizers topic shows you how to include TextMate files as well as providing guidance on how you can create your own themes, snippets and language colorizers. Writing an Extension

Lots of great community ideas for VS Code features are better implemented as extensions rather than as part of the core product. This way users can easily pick and choose the functionality they want, by installing the right set of extensions. The VS Code team tracks possible extensions as GitHub issues labeled *extension-candidate in the vscode repository. If you’re looking for a great extension to build, have a look at the *extension-candidate issues. Next Steps

If you are interested in extending VS Code, you are in the right place. Here we present an outline of the VS Code extensibility documentation and how to quickly build your first VS Code extension. If you’re curious about our design approach to extensibility for VS Code, you can read about it here.

All VS Code extensions share a common model of contribution (registration), activation (loading) and access to the VS Code extensibility API. There are however two special flavors of VS Code extensions, language servers and debuggers, which have their own additional protocols and are covered in their own sections of the documentation.

Language servers let you create a dedicated process for your extension. This is a useful design choice for your extension when your extension runs high cost CPU or IO intensive tasks which could slow other extensions. This is common for tasks that work across all files in a workspace e.g. linters or static analysis suites.

VS Code implements a generic debugger UI and relies on debugger extensions and so called "debug adapters" to connect the debug UI to a real debugger or runtime. A debug adapter is a dedicated process that communicates with VS Code through the VS Code Debug Protocol and can be implemented in any language.

The easiest way to see VS Code extensions in action is via the Extension Marketplace. You can browse for useful extensions, install them to try them out and get an idea how you might extend VS Code for your own development scenarios. Language Extension Guidelines

The Language Extension Guidelines topic can help you to decide what language features you’d like to support with your extension. It shows the various language features available in VS Code (for example, code suggestions and actions, formatting, renaming) and how to implement them through either the language server protocol or by using the extensibility API directly from your extension. Themes, Snippets, and Colorizers

You can have a great editing experience for your programming language with simple things such as syntax highlighting, useful snippets, and a well designed color theme. TextMate customization files provide this support and VS Code lets you easily package and reuse these so you can directly use .tmTheme, .tmSnippets, and .tmLanguage files in your extension. Our Themes, Snippets, and Colorizers topic shows you how to include TextMate files as well as providing guidance on how you can create your own themes, snippets and language colorizers. Writing an Extension

Lots of great community ideas for VS Code features are better implemented as extensions rather than as part of the core product. This way users can easily pick and choose the functionality they want, by installing the right set of extensions. The VS Code team tracks possible extensions as GitHub issues labeled *extension-candidate in the vscode repository. If you’re looking for a great extension to build, have a look at the *extension-candidate issues. Next Steps