Caruso on an acoustic victrola – page 3 electricity measurements units

The idea is that with the first couple of revolutions, the needle wears down to snugly fit the groove. That way, it transmits the vibrations more directly to the diaphragm in the reproducer. If you continue to use the same needle, the groove continues to wear away the sides of the needle, making it into a sharp point that eventually starts to dig into the bottom of the groove. That is what has happened on records with "graying". As long as you change the needle with each play, it doesn’t have a chance to damage the groove.

The important thing to remember with 78s when you estimate playing time is that you have to add time for cranking, changing needles and flipping the record with each song. So it would be more like 10 four minute sides per hour, not 16. That comes out to about 25 cents per hour for needles. Another financial consideration is the cost of the records. They usually cost 50 cents to a dollar apiece in junk stores. So you’re talking somewhere between $3 to $5 per hour. CDs are $10 to $15 usually.

The idea is that with the first couple of revolutions, the needle wears down to snugly fit the groove. That way, it transmits the vibrations more directly to the diaphragm in the reproducer. If you continue to use the same needle, the groove continues to wear away the sides of the needle, making it into a sharp point that eventually starts to dig into the bottom of the groove. That is what has happened on records with "graying". As long as you change the needle with each play, it doesn’t have a chance to damage the groove.

The important thing to remember with 78s when you estimate playing time is that you have to add time for cranking, changing needles and flipping the record with each song. So it would be more like 10 four minute sides per hour, not 16. That comes out to about 25 cents per hour for needles. Another financial consideration is the cost of the records. They usually cost 50 cents to a dollar apiece in junk stores. So you’re talking somewhere between $3 to $5 per hour. CDs are $10 to $15 usually.Thanks for replying Bigshot. I may be trying to flog a dead horse here, but is it possible to chop off the sharp end of the needle, so as to get it back to its original condition? That way you get to reuse them until they are too short to use.

Should we completely lose our electrical grid, and we have to revert back to a pre-electricity society, I don’t imagine I will have the time to listen to some crackly music that you have to flip over every 4 minutes, and pop in a new needle. And who exactly will be providing you with needles after such an apocalyptic event? And how will you communicate with them to purchase more? Pony express? You’ll enjoy your music for a little while, and then you’ll be in the same boat as us.I’ve had my gramophone and shellac records since I was about twelve years old, way before I knew anything about peak oil. If one were ‘prepping’ for a grid down situation and starting from scratch, music would probably be a very low priority! I believe this thread has already covered the options for replacement needles, and Bigshot’s suggestion of stockpiling steel needles in advance is probably the most practical one yet, assuming thorn needles are not worth the effort of making at home. I wonder if digitizing my collection is the way to go, provided that we can generate electricity to power the laptop/ CD player/ tablet/ whatever. The real problem for listening post-TEOTWAWKI would be if these gadgets were to break down and replacement parts could not be found, although difficulties playing music would probably be the last of anybody’s problems then!

I’ve had my gramophone and shellac records since I was about twelve years old, way before I knew anything about peak oil. If one were ‘prepping’ for a grid down situation and starting from scratch, music would probably be a very low priority! I believe this thread has already covered the options for replacement needles, and Bigshot’s suggestion of stockpiling steel needles in advance is probably the most practical one yet, assuming thorn needles are not worth the effort of making at home. I wonder if digitizing my collection is the way to go, provided that we can generate electricity to power the laptop/ CD player/ tablet/ whatever. The real problem for listening post-TEOTWAWKI would be if these gadgets were to break down and replacement parts could not be found, although difficulties playing music would probably be the last of anybody’s problems then!Mp3 players are cheap to manufacture and don’t use much power. I would expect them to be around whatever the financial meltdown, so digitisation and 5v devices are the way to go.