Celebrating 81 years as…. – apprenticeship info e85 gas stations colorado

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Approximately two to four weeks after you take the test battery, your local JATC will receive the results. They will subsequently notify you concerning the disposition of your application. A full six (6) months must elapse before you may retake the test. The six month rule remains in effect after each subsequent retake of the test.

If you obtain a qualifying score on the test battery, you will be scheduled for an oral interview. You will be interviewed by a committee representing both NECA and the IBEW. Based on the interview, and a review of your qualifications, you will receive an overall ranking. Your name will be placed on an eligibility list for two (2) years. As new positions become available in the apprenticeship program, names will be taken off the respective eligibility list in order of the ranking score. If you are not selected to begin an apprenticeship during that two-year period, you will need to reapply if you are still interested.

If you are a person with a physical or mental impairment (including learning disabilities) that you believe may affect your ability to complete any aspect of the application process (including testing), and if you need an accommodation to ensure that the test battery accurately measures your skills and abilities, you must notify the AJATC/JATC before, or as soon as you are scheduled to take the NJATC aptitude test battery.

• Do not attempt to retake the test battery for six (6) months after your last test date. If you retest before the six (6) month period has elapsed, your score will not be valid and you will not be allowed to retest for another six (6) months. Please take this warning seriously. This is YOUR responsibility.

The fact that an applicant is not scheduled for an oral interview, as a result of this test battery, does not speak for the applicant’s ability, or lack thereof, to be most successful in many other occupations. This test was specifically developed to assist our program sponsors, helping them to select those who are most likely to succeed in our

Many apprenticeship programs receive large numbers of applicants – four, five, six or more times the number of new apprenticeship openings (as defined by the limited number of job and training opportunities being available at a given time). The validated testing instrument is a tool to assist in the selection of the very best applicants that have an aptitude matching the specified job performance requirements. In this way, the number of applicants brought to the interview table is based upon objective, equitable, job-related criteria.

As part of the selection process, you may be required to take an aptitude test battery designed to determine whether you possess the abilities that will help you succeed within the electrical construction industry. The following pages provide a description of each of the tests and some sample test questions. These questions are similar to those on the actual tests, allowing you to know what to expect on the day of your test session.

This test measures your ability to obtain information from written passages. You will be presented with a passage followed by a number of questions about it. A sample passage is shown below, followed by three sample questions. This passage is shorter than those on the actual test.

The timing of New Year’s Day has changed with customs and calendars. The Mayan civilization, on what is now called the Yucatan peninsula of Mexico, celebrated the New Year on one of the two days when the noonday sun is directly overhead. In the equatorial regions of the earth, between the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, the sun is in this position twice a year, once on its passage southward, and once on its passage northward. At the early Mayan city of Izapa in the southern Yucatan, the overhead date for the sun on its southward passage was August 13. The Mayans celebrated this as the date for the beginning of the New Year. Later at the more northerly Mayan site at Edzna, the corresponding overhead date is July 26. Analyses of Mayan pictorial calendars indicate that they celebrated the New Year on August 13 prior to 150 AD, and on July 26 after that year. This change has been explained by archaeological dating showing that 150 AD was the time that the Mayans moved the hub of their civilization from the southern to the northern site.