Chief privacy officers the unicorns of k-12 education edsurge news gas and bloating after miscarriage

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The intent here is good, says Linnette Attai, a K-12 privacy expert and founder of the global compliance consulting firm PlayWell, LLC. Schools and districts collect, manage and analyze more data now than ever before. That data can be used to improve K-12 decision-making, tailor instruction gas jewelry to each student and flag when one student needs extra attention or assistance. But because data can also be misused, abused, exposed and manipulated, it must be protected. Thus, the need for a Chief Privacy Officer—someone who can establish and enforce privacy policies, train staff on privacy procedures and ensure that all 7 gas station data is collected and shared safely.

But the reality is that Chief Privacy Officers in K-12 education are about as common as unicorns. EdSurge contacted education nonprofits, a technology association and a handful of privacy experts, and none could identify a single school district with a K-12 CPO. In fact, it is still extremely rare for districts to hire even one full-time employee dedicated to privacy—leadership or otherwise—says Attai, who frequently advises K-12 districts on privacy issues.

In at least two public school districts—both large systems that serve close to or more than 100,000 students—that’s how it works. Denver Public Schools in Colorado and Baltimore County Public Schools in Maryland have each hired a senior-level official who is responsible for the organization’s privacy policies and data governance. Denver electricity invented in homes’s Student Data Privacy Officer

Colorado was one of the first states, along with California and Connecticut, to pass a sweeping student privacy law, Westerman says. The law focuses on three main areas: data use and data use restrictions for third parties; data destruction, which is required at the end of a contract term or vendor relationship; and transparency, so the public can know which vendors each district does business with.

When the state legislature passed its privacy bill in summer 2016, a group of district technology leaders in the state convened to get a game plan. “We said, ‘OK, this new law is going to be big and change a lot about how we do business. Let’s come up with a contract template for this but one that still allows us to do our own thing,’” Westerman recalls. “There was a lot electricity bill cost of consensus and collaboration with that.”

Westerman is a “team of one” at DPS, he says, which makes him the only person in the state in his role or one like it, although district IT staff are sometimes drafted. “There are other people who do this work, but it’s not an official designation. They’re told, ‘Hey, this is part of your job now.’ Those folks need the simplest, easiest ways to manage this stuff. In Denver, we are fortunate enough to get to take a hard look.”

When Corns was in the director role, he attended bi-monthly meetings with leadership to discuss updates and changes that had been made to the district’s data privacy and data governance policies, and he frequently met with the electricity wikipedia in hindi district’s “chiefs” to discuss privacy issues, he says. “It’s definitely a best practice to have somebody work to ensure privacy at that level.”

The intent here is good gas jet compressor, says Linnette Attai, a K-12 privacy expert and founder of the global compliance consulting firm PlayWell, LLC. Schools and districts collect, manage and analyze more data now than ever before. That data can be used to improve K-12 decision-making, tailor instruction to each student and flag when one student needs extra attention or assistance. But because data can also be misused, abused, exposed and manipulated, it must be protected. Thus, the need for a Chief Privacy Officer—someone who can establish and enforce privacy policies, train staff on privacy procedures and ensure that all electricity physics definition data is collected and shared safely.

But the reality is that Chief Privacy Officers in K-12 education are about as common as unicorns. EdSurge contacted education nonprofits, a technology association and a handful of privacy experts, and none could identify a single school district with a K-12 CPO. In fact, it is still extremely rare for districts to hire even one full-time employee dedicated to privacy—leadership or otherwise—says Attai, who frequently advises K-12 districts on privacy issues.

In at least two public school districts—both large systems that serve close to or more than 100,000 students—that’s how it works. Denver Public Schools in Colorado and Baltimore County Public Schools in Maryland have each hired a senior-level official who is responsible for the organization’s privacy policies and data governance. Denver’s Student Data Privacy Officer

Colorado was one of the first states, along with California gas 87 and Connecticut, to pass a sweeping student privacy law, Westerman says. The law focuses on three main areas: data use and data use restrictions for third parties; data destruction, which is required at the end of a contract term or vendor relationship; and transparency, so the public can know which vendors each district does business with.

When the state legislature passed its privacy bill in summer 2016, a group of district technology leaders in the state convened to get a game plan. “We said, ‘OK, this new gas density and molar mass law is going to be big and change a lot about how we do business. Let’s come up with a contract template for this but one that still allows us to do our own thing,’” Westerman recalls. “There was a lot of consensus and collaboration with that.”

Westerman is a “team of one” at DPS, he says, which makes him the only person in the state in his role or one like it, although district IT staff are sometimes drafted. “There are other people who do this work, but it’s not an official designation. They’re told, ‘Hey, this is part of your job now.’ Those folks need the simplest, easiest ways to manage this stuff. In Denver, we are fortunate enough to get to take a hard look.”

When Corns was in the director role, he attended bi-monthly meetings with leadership to discuss updates and changes that had been made to the district’s data privacy and data governance policies, and he frequently met with the district’s “chiefs” to discuss privacy issues, he says. “It’s definitely a best practice to have somebody zyklon b gas canister for sale work to ensure privacy at that level.”