Children face starvation and amputations in yemen pulitzer center electricity worksheets for 4th grade

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“We had my room just over there,” 18-year-old Moawad tells me. His neighborhood was ground zero in a battle between Yemen’s government and Houthi rebels back in 2015. His home is still a pile of rubble, but, luckily, he and his family were not home when the missile hit.

But Imad wasn’t so lucky. He was just 5 years old when his home was hit. He lost both his legs, but not his spirit. Now 8 years old, he’s one of many children being fitted with prosthetic limbs here at the Prosthesis and Physical Therapy Center in Aden.

And for a child like Imad, whose amputation left so little of his thigh, the prosthetic has to be locked at the knee, which means he can’t bend it at will. Walking is cumbersome and painful. He’s had this pair of prosthetics for two years, and he doesn’t even take them home.

Fifty-six schools have been destroyed in the country, and another several hundred have been damaged. Teachers are not getting paid by the government because the government is using its resources for its war effort, and there’s a low tax base to begin with.

This is the rubble of an elementary school. It was bombed in 2015. It’s been three years, and no one’s rebuilt it. Now the kids go to school in these tents. The principal says they’re choking from the sand and the heat is unbearable. But he says enrollment never changed.

Gamaa is 14 years old. She quit school last year after her father died and her mother couldn’t support her. And two months ago, she married 16-year-old Ababdulrahman. At first, she would barely speak. Then we asked the men to leave the room, so that we could a little bit talk more intimately.

Mohammed ordered the printer from China, and waited a month for it to arrive. They have gone through six different prototypes, running the printer day and night at his family’s home. It’s an arduous process in a country with failing infrastructure.

At this stage, only six people have received their new prosthetic hands, and Ali is one of them. He’s just 15 years old, but he lost his hand last year fighting on the front line, like so many boys his age on both sides of the conflict. He says he chose to do this to avenge Houthi invaders.

“We had my room just over there,” 18-year-old Moawad tells me. His neighborhood was ground zero in a battle between Yemen’s government and Houthi rebels back in 2015. His home is still a pile of rubble, but, luckily, he and his family were not home when the missile hit.

But Imad wasn’t so lucky. He was just 5 years old when his home was hit. He lost both his legs, but not his spirit. Now 8 years old, he’s one of many children being fitted with prosthetic limbs here at the Prosthesis and Physical Therapy Center in Aden.

And for a child like Imad, whose amputation left so little of his thigh, the prosthetic has to be locked at the knee, which means he can’t bend it at will. Walking is cumbersome and painful. He’s had this pair of prosthetics for two years, and he doesn’t even take them home.

Fifty-six schools have been destroyed in the country, and another several hundred have been damaged. Teachers are not getting paid by the government because the government is using its resources for its war effort, and there’s a low tax base to begin with.

This is the rubble of an elementary school. It was bombed in 2015. It’s been three years, and no one’s rebuilt it. Now the kids go to school in these tents. The principal says they’re choking from the sand and the heat is unbearable. But he says enrollment never changed.

Gamaa is 14 years old. She quit school last year after her father died and her mother couldn’t support her. And two months ago, she married 16-year-old Ababdulrahman. At first, she would barely speak. Then we asked the men to leave the room, so that we could a little bit talk more intimately.

Mohammed ordered the printer from China, and waited a month for it to arrive. They have gone through six different prototypes, running the printer day and night at his family’s home. It’s an arduous process in a country with failing infrastructure.

At this stage, only six people have received their new prosthetic hands, and Ali is one of them. He’s just 15 years old, but he lost his hand last year fighting on the front line, like so many boys his age on both sides of the conflict. He says he chose to do this to avenge Houthi invaders.