Combustible gas fumes in sump pump pit – page 2 – plumbing zone – professional plumbers forum gas density

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To your question, the furnace room has both a sump pump pit and a sewer grinder / ejector pit. The sewer ejector pit is exactly as you describe… it has a bolted down lid that is sealed with caulking and two pvc pipes, one incoming and the other outgoing with a check valve. The sump pump pit has the removable lid with the U shaped hole for the outgoing pipe and a lead-in tile where water flows in inside the pit. There is no hydrogen sulfide smell that comes with sewer gas inside the sump pit, it has a few inches of clear water only in it. It is the sump pump pit that I’m checking with the methane / propane detector. You can see it in the video that I posted.

I’ve retested the sump pump pit a couple times and the sniffer shows higher levels of around >320 ppm when the hvac system is running. When the hvac system is off and no air is circulating, sniffer readings are >80 or below. So it would appear that suction / negative pressure is being created by the hvac system and pulling these fumes into the sump pump pit which could then be drawn into the duct work in the furnace room and circulated through the house.

To your question, the furnace room has both a sump pump pit and a sewer grinder / ejector pit. The sewer ejector pit is exactly as you describe… it has a bolted down lid that is sealed with caulking and two pvc pipes, one incoming and the other outgoing with a check valve. gas and supply acworth ga The sump pump pit has the removable lid with the U shaped hole for the outgoing pipe and a lead-in tile where water flows in inside the pit. There is no hydrogen sulfide smell that comes with sewer gas inside the sump pit, it has a few inches of clear water only in it. It is the sump pump pit that I’m checking with the methane / propane detector. You can see it in the video that I posted.

I’ve retested the sump pump pit a couple times and the sniffer shows higher levels of around >320 ppm when the hvac system is running. When the hvac system is off and no air is circulating, sniffer readings are >80 or below. So it would appear that suction / negative pressure is being created by the hvac system and pulling these fumes into the sump pump pit which could then be drawn into the duct work in the furnace room and circulated through the house.

First step you need to do is find a plumber and a drain cleaner outfit in your area and have all the underground inspected. electricity clipart Might cost a couple or few hundred bucks, but would my first step. Don’t go and rent one if available in your area. You need trained eyes. Like when you watch curse of oak island…. I can’t make heads or tails of the GPR.

Plumber Bill – You are correct. I don’t know what the hell I was thinking when I described the sewage ejector pit. Tired maybe and not thinking correctly. But yes… discharge pipe is the one with the check valve, and the other pipe is the vent that runs up and out of the roof. gasoline p The intake obviously attaches on the side of the extractor pit which is all under the concrete floor.

Also, I visited with our propane provider this afternoon. Explained everything to them and asked if they had ever encountered anything similar. They had never heard of anything like my situation before. But, like you folks, they are very interested in hearing the outcome. So, I’ll call a couple of plumbers this weekend who are friends of the family and don’t mind answering their phones on the weekends. Will see if they have any ideas. I did mention the issue to a cousin who joined us yesterday for Thanksgiving dinner. electricity projects for grade 7 He’s a real estate agent, has been in a lot of houses, and said that he has heard of this issue happening elsewhere.

Plumber Bill – You are correct. I don’t know what the hell I was thinking when I described the sewage ejector pit. Tired maybe and not thinking correctly. But yes… discharge pipe is the one with the check valve, and the other pipe is the vent that runs up and out of the roof. The intake obviously attaches on the side of the extractor pit which is all under the concrete floor.

Also, I visited with our propane provider this afternoon. Explained everything to them and asked if they had ever encountered anything similar. They had never heard of anything like my situation before. But, like you folks, they are very interested in hearing the outcome. z gastroenterol So, I’ll call a couple of plumbers this weekend who are friends of the family and don’t mind answering their phones on the weekends. Will see if they have any ideas. I did mention the issue to a cousin who joined us yesterday for Thanksgiving dinner. He’s a real estate agent, has been in a lot of houses, and said that he has heard of this issue happening elsewhere.