Cosmetic implant q gastrobar leblon

Cosmetic augmentation has been performed with synthetic devices for over 50 years. Devices designed to be surgically implanted into human tissue have been developed and used in many human tissue areas such as breast, buttocks, calf, pectoral and others. The development of these implant devices over the years has ranged from liquid filled to solid substances and many include silicone based components. More recently silicone gel filled implants have become popular because of their resistance to rupture and widespread filling material extravasation as well as their more natural appearance and texture. The vast majority of breast implants is a single large implant in the form of a silicone shell that is filled with a saline solution or silicone gel filling material. A significant complication that can occur with the single large implant is capsular contracture, where abnormal scar tissue forms around the implant.

The field of cosmetic human tissue augmentation has not enjoyed the same advantages of minimally invasive technology as other surgical science fields and developments of a minimally invasive cosmetic augmentation approach have gained only limited attention. A major disadvantage of microimplants proposed in the past is the propensity for these microimplants to develop high friction between each other leading to shear forces between the microimplants as well as creating a texture to external palpation of the human tissue. Microballoons in the past have been described as a polymeric shell with a filling substance. The requirement of a filling port makes a smooth and continuous outer surface design impossible. Also, typical pendant functionality in cured silicone compositions is trimethyl. This creates a very high surface friction in typical silicones. This silicone to silicone coefficient of friction is >1.0.

Systems and methods for breast augmentation are shown in U.S. Pat. No. 7,169,180 issued Jan. 30, 2007 and U.S. Pat. No. 8,092,527 issued Jan. 10, 2012. The disclosures of these references are hereby incorporated fully by reference. These systems describe microballoons including a flexible, enclosed shell defining an open interior that is filled with a liquid, gas or gel filling material. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The silicone gel core can have a gel penetration stiffness of between 2.5 and 20 mm. The silicone gel core can have a gel penetration stiffness between 5.0 and 15 mm. The silicone gel core can have a gel penetration stiffness between 8.5 and 10.5 mm.

The elastic modulus of the silicone gel core can be between 1,000 and 15,000 Pascals. The elastic modulus of the silicone gel core can be between 2,000 and 10,000 Pascals. The elastic modulus of the silicone gel core can be between 3,000 and 9,500 Pascals.

The silicone gel core can be formed from a reactive polydimethyl siloxane polymer having a viscosity of from 100 centipoises to 100,000 centipoises. The silicone gel core can comprise at least one selected from the group consisting of Nusil MED-6342, Nusil MED-6345, Nusil MED-6350, Nusil MED-6311, Applied Silicone 40022, Applied Silicone 40135, and Applied Silicone 40008.

The cosmetic implant can include an intermediate coating between the silicone gel core and the outermost coating. The intermediate coating can comprise a resinous silicone coating on all sides of the silicone gel core; wherein the intermediate coating is between and adhered to both of the silicone gel core and to the outermost coating. The intermediate coating can have a thickness of from 0.5 to 500 microns.

The outermost coating can have a implant to implant static and kinetic coefficient of friction between 0.025 and 1.0. The outermost coating can provide an implant to implant static and kinetic coefficient of friction between 0.05 and 0.6. The outermost coating can provide a implant to implant static and kinetic coefficient of friction between 0.1 and 0.4.

A method of making a cosmetic implant can include the steps of forming a silicone gel core and coating the silicone gel core with an outermost hydrophilic coating layer. An intermediate resinous silicone coating layer can be provided on all sides of the silicone gel core, and the intermediate coating layer can be coated with the outermost continuous hydrophilic coating on all sides of the intermediate coating layer. The intermediate coating layer is between and adhered to both of the silicone gel core and the outermost hydrophilic coating layer.

A method of performing cosmetic surgery on a patient, includes the step of providing a plurality of cosmetic implants, the implants comprising a silicone gel core and an outermost continuous hydrophilic coating on all sides of the silicone gel core. An incision is made in the patient to provide access to a subcutaneous pocket. A plurality of cosmetic implants are placed in the subcutaneous pocket. The method can further include the step of forming a subcutaneous pocket after making the incision.

Breast augmentation requires supplementing the human tissue with prosthetic device(s). The minimally invasive method of the invention begins with a small incision, through which the surgeon develops a tissue pocket under the desired tissue for augmentation. The surgeon then delivers three or more deformable microimplants into the tissue pocket to achieve tissue augmentation. The microimplants are constructed of biologically compatible material, deformable in character and possess an external hydrophilic surface to reduce friction between the microimplants as well as reduce friction between the implants and the host human tissue. The microimplants do not require a filling and thus do not require a filling port. The microimplants of the invention are composed of a semisolid elastomeric core made from a material which provides some give to external forces such as palpation, but is not rigid to the touch and does not flow or deform without external force at body temperatures. A lubricious hydrophilic material coats the semisolid elastomeric core. The coating facilitates the movement of the implants relative to one another and to surrounding tissue forming the subcutaneous pocket. This movement improves both the appearance and feel of the implant. In addition the exterior hydrophillic outer surface having pendant —OH functionality or similar hydrophilic functionality will provide a much more biocompatible surface for the implant. This is possible from the surface chemistry mimics the aqueous interior of our body tissues and fluids.