Could bright house networks customers have problems similar to frontier’s during charter merger electricity laws in pakistan

With regulatory approval of Charter’s $67 billion merger with Bright House and Time Warner Cable expected soon, Bright House customers throughout the region can’t help but wonder if they too might face lengthy TV, Internet and phone outages suffered by hundreds of upset Frontier customers.

Bright House is Tampa Bay’s biggest Internet and TV provider. So if Charter’s merger brings some of the same complaints about Frontier — week-long outages, abysmal customer service, clueless tech support — the transition could prove even more disruptive than Frontier’s.

"It’s like planning the D-Day invasion," said Andrew Corn, chief of EBS Networks of Tarpon Springs, which manages information technology for companies. "No matter how much planning you do, you know you are going to lose some soldiers on the beach. That doesn’t stop you from landing on the beach. (Telecoms) know that some customers will have problems" and work to minimize them.

Mike Flynn, Frontier’s regional president, said this days before Frontier’s takeover of Verizon assets: "We’re doing everything we can within our power … from the experience we’ve gleaned from every conversion we have done to make the next one better. So I’d just say we’re pretty experienced at it."

"When we acquire Bright House, we acquire all of Bright House," said Venich. "For us, ultimately we are going to have a corporate organization that is centralized" with regional operations groups that will include large numbers of Bright House staff.

Frontier acquired 3.7 million phone connections, and 3.4 million Internet and TV connections from Verizon. The company has not said how many customers those numbers represent. One customer might have a one connection each for phone, TV and Internet. Another may get just phone service.

Charter, meantime, is expected to acquire 23.9 million customers nationally. Of those, 2.5 million are Bright House customers. Bright House, which operates in five states, does not break out customer numbers in Tampa Bay. (TWC does not serve Tampa Bay.)

Martin Callery is vice president of the Charter Group of Companies, a Tampa-based firm that works in real estate, construction and the hospitality industry. He said the company gets most of its Internet service from a Bright House customer. He said Frontier’s experience has led the firm to make sure it has Internet backup when Charter takes over by using mobile phone hot spots. (Callery’s company is unrelated to Charter Communications.)

"Frontier was a wake-up call for a lot of people," he said. "It was for us. Day in and day out, you become absolutely reliant on these services. When something goes down, you can lose thousands of dollars an hour. So we’re a little worried."

"They’re bound to have some issues," said Hunter Newby, CEO of Allied Fiber, a New York company that builds and operates fiber optic networks. "There’s some risk to it. But listen, if they’ve done their due diligence and studied the network they’re acquiring, then they know how it works, they know how it runs … They ask all the right questions to mitigate the risk."