Coulsdon – wikipedia gas 10 ethanol

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The valley and routes in Smitham Bottom encouraged some early settlements. An Inn at the ‘Red Lion’ appears in the Bainbridge map of 1783. The coming of the railway and improved road links encouraged buildings along the sides of the major roadways and close to the stations. Since 1921. the sales of the old estate lands have replaced a countryside of discrete farms, with thousands gas after eating salad of suburban dwellings.

In the first two decades of the second millennium, Coulsdon’s retail area lost Woolworth’s and the bookstore on Chipstead Valley Road (Turners’) and opened The Pembroke [36] and Caffé Nero. Waitrose has a longstanding branch in the centre, and Tesco Express opened in the period mentioned. A planned Sainsbury’s with apartments above has been singled out for note by periodical New London Architecture. [37] Aldi opened a branch in Coulsdon in 2015.

The name derives from Cuðrædsdun via Cullesdone pre-1130, Culesdone pre-1190, Cullisdon 1242, Culesdene 1255, Colendone c1270, Kulisdon 1279, Collesdon 1288, Cullesdon 1323, Colleston 1324, Coulesdon 1346, Cullysdon 1377, Colynsdon 1428, Colysdon 1439, Collysdon 1563, Cowlesdon 1557, Coulsdon 1597, Cowisden 1604, Couldisdon 1610, Couldesdon gas house 1675, Culsdon 1678, Colsdon 1724. [44] [45]

Additional variations include Curedesdone 675, Cudredesdone 675, Cudredesdune 967, Coulsdon 1083, Colesdone 1085, Culesdon 1234, Culisdon 1242, Cudredestreow 1251, Cullesdon 1266, Colesdene 1287, Colesdon 1290, Colesdun 1290, Culesdon 1291, Culesden 1292, Colieston 1324, Coulesden 1326, Coueleston 1332, Colisdon 1344, Culeston 1346, Cullysdon 1377, Cullisdoun 1403, Cullesdoun 1422, Culledon 1424, Colynsdon 1428, Collesdon 1439, Culsdon 1446, Cowlesdon 1539, Collesden 1544, Cowlesdowne 1553, Cullesdoy 1556, Colsdon 1558, Cowlesden 1558, Cullesden 1558, Cowllysdon 1567, Cowisden 1618, Coulsden 1619, Cowsdon 1620, Coolsden 1650, Coulesden 1650, Coilsoun 1655, Coulden 1655. [46] [47]

Coulsdon is a largely suburban district of London. The central area has substantial industrial, automotive and distribution services, convenience, standard socialising and niche retail as well as local professions of a typical town in the country, by its main road and main railway stations: Coulsdon South and Coulsdon Town. The alternate centre, Old Coulsdon, has a recreation ground/cricket pitch-focused village green, a much smaller parade of shops than Coulsdon’s high street between Coulsdon South and Town stations and a medieval church. London’s ‘ Brighton Road’, locally the official name, and the railways, served gasbuddy va by both semi-fast and stopping services, give Smitham Bottom/Valley a bustling, busier setting for economic life.

Old Coulsdon occupies the south-east of the district. [58] Scattered, rather than clustered are six listed buildings, for their national heritage and architectural value, at Grade II. Two categories above this, in the highest class, Grade I is the Church of St John the Evangelist here. This is by the recreation ground, shortly after Marlpit Lane has been joined by Coulsdon Road, from the north. St John’s is late thirteen century with extensive later additions, made of flint and rubble with much brick patching. Its nave spans two (window) bays. Older still is its good chancel of 1250 with stepped sedilia and piscina. The west tower above the entrance is of circa 1400 with corner buttresses and a tapering broach spire. A nave at right angles, replacing the south aisle; in decorated style was designed for its 1958 construction by J B S Comper. [59] Smitham Bottom or Valley [ edit ]

At the heart of the geographical feature Smitham Bottom (where three dry valleys merge into one) [20] is this downtown part of the district. Most commerce and industry is here, set beside the Brighton Road, which is since 2006 a town centre arc of the A23 road and on Chipstead Valley Road which terminates half way along the arc, leading directly to Woodmansterne. The various local feeder roads reach this street, including gas efficient cars the combined one from the south-east, Marlpit Lane, under the A23 without needing a junction with that trunk (long-distance) route (which later becomes the M23).

The soil is dry, and water was obtained even in 1912 by deep wells here in the chalk. This dry valley in the chalk, Smitham Bottom, has a watercourse below, the water of which in until the 16th century occasionally in times of flood ran here but after this, inexplicably, waits to break out as far as at the foot of the chalk in Croydon and Beddington, running through gas x strips walmart it. [20] The Marlpit business and industrial estate [ edit ]

The Mount or Clockhouse is a square neighbourhood on a hill plateau with marked borders along three residential roads from Coulsdon, one of which continues from the town centre as the London Loop path, via the Banstead Downs and East Ewell to Nonsuch Palace 4 miles (6.4 km) north-west. It shares its local authority with that place as it is part of the London Borough of Sutton. [60] Coulsdon Woods [ edit ]

In 1883, to prevent further loss of Common lands arising from the Inclosure Acts, the Corporation of London (under provisions of the Corporation of London (Open Spaces) Act, 1878), purchased from Squire Byron (Lord of the Manor of Coulsdon) Farthing Downs, Coulsdon Common and Kenley Common, to add to the earlier purchase of Riddlesdown Common. [28] [29] The London Borough of Croydon own and maintain several parks, including Happy Valley, which, together with Farthing Downs, is designated is a Site of Special Scientific Interest. [66]

Grange Park was obtained partly by Public Subscription but mostly by the Urban District Council in 1929 from the owners of the Coulsdon Court Golf Course. The land was sold for use as an open space or pleasure and recreation ground. Grange Park was formerly part of Squire Byrons Coulsdon Court Estate. Grange Park is situated in a designated conservation area in the heart of Old Coulsdon and incorporates a children’s play area and recreational green space. In total, Grange Park represents local green space of around yoga gas relief pose 8 acres.

Gordon Pirie (1931–1991), an English long-distance runner lived in Coulsdon and was a member of South London Harriers, one of the oldest and most successful athletics club in Britain. The club has been based in Coulsdon since 1913, and remains there to this day. The club competes in cross-country, road running and track and field events, and trains from its Coulsdon HQ three times a week. The club has been heavily involved in recent years in building an eight lane all weather running track at Woodcote School. It also has an active and successful triathlon section. [77]

Cricket. Old Coulsdon had one of the first cricket clubs in the world, founded in 1762. It was one of the strongest teams in the country in the late 18th and early 19th century and once boasted eight England internationals, as well as a young Stuart Surridge. The club was possibly the first to use three stumps and two bails and frequently played matches on the most famous early cricket gas up shawty grounds such as Mitcham, and later in Grange Park in the village. In 1995 falling player numbers forced the club to merge with the nearby Redhill Cricket Club, playing at the Ring on Earlswood Common in the Earlswood neighbourhood of Redhill as Redhill Old Coulsdon Cricket Club. Cricket was originally played at ‘Smitham Bottom’ opposite the Red Lion. The first archived results come from a games was played in 1731 (Surrey vs East Grinstead). A ‘Cricket Shed’ appears in Smitham Bottom as a fixed building in a map of 1785. [88] In the 1880s, this area became was built over, and the club moved to Old Coulsdon. From the 1920s, cricket was played at The Memorial Gardens.

Martial arts. The Coulsdon Martial Arts Club (also known as Yoshin Ryu) is long established and electricity lyrics very popular with children and adults. Yoshin Ryu was originally started in the late seventies as a collection of clubs based in youth centres and sports halls around the Croydon area run by founder and senior coach Errol Field, 7th dan Judo, 5th dan Karate (Shotokan), 6th dan jujitsu. Coulsdon Martial Arts is on the site of what was originally a ‘tin’ church built by the Roman Catholic Church in 1916. [98]. The church building located on this site was purchased in the mid-1990s and converted into a full-time dojo and club HQ. The club president is Mr Brian Jacks – 10th Dan Judo, Olympic Judo medallist, holder of several European and World Judo titles. His bronze medal from the 1972 Olympic Games in Munich was donated to the club and can be seen on display in the foyer. [ citation needed]

The United Kingdom Census 2011 recorded that the two wards: Coulsdon East (ward) and Coulsdon West (ward), divided by the A23 road contained respectively: 12,244 people living in 4,912 wd gaster theory homes and 13,449 living in 4,793 homes. The percentage of the population who declared their health as very good was 47% and 51% respectively. [1] White British was the majority ethnic group in both wards: 80% and 70% of the population respectively. [101] [102] Education [ edit ]

To maintain a regular elevation at Coulsdon required large changes in direction and the construction of 20 ft embankments and a road bridge. Remnants of the 1805 railway embankment are still evident. [106] [107] The railway closed in 1838 due to underuse. [108] A bridge over the Chipstead Valley road was demolished as dangerous in 1854. [109]

• Coulsdon North. Named ‘Stoats Nest and Cane Hill’ (1899–1910) or simply ‘Stoats Nest’ [114] and replaced the earlier ‘Stoats Nest Station’, which was further north, ‘Coulsdon and Smitham Downs’ (1911), ‘Coulsdon West’ (1923), ‘Coulsdon North’ (later in 1923). The station closed in 1983. It was on the Quarry Line and included terminal platforms and sidings. [109]