Counterculture boston – massachusetts (ma) – page 7 – city-data forum grade 9 electricity unit test answers

In the past, sure…but compared to other cities Boston is not currently some massive generator of new music is it? (honestly asking). If you want to get deeply into the local music culture, sure, I’m sure there is tons to see/hear. – I am peripherally aware of that. But for the casual gig-goer, meh. There are great venues, and I love that about living here, but it seems to me that there are many other places with a much more open and accessible arts scene. If you go up to Portland, or even Salem, my sense is that music and other arts are just way more a part of community life.

I’m from London, which is obviously a way bigger city, and when I lived there I was in a different stage of my life so that will affect my perception too, but I would be out seeing new music every week – in small bars near my flat, in larger venues, in pubs, literally hundreds and hundreds of venues…there is nothing of that scale, and ease of accessibility here in Boston as far as I can tell. But also, the type of music I like is much less popular here, so…there’s that.

In the past, sure…but compared to other cities Boston is not currently some massive generator of new music is it? (honestly asking). If you want to get deeply into the local music culture, sure, I’m sure there is tons to see/hear. – I am peripherally aware of that. But for the casual gig-goer, meh. There are great venues, and I love that about living here, but it seems to me that there are many other places with a much more open and accessible arts scene. If you go up to Portland, or even Salem, my sense is that music and other arts are just way more a part of community life.

I’m from London, which is obviously a way bigger city, and when I lived there I was in a different stage of my life so that will affect my perception too, but I would be out seeing new music every week – in small bars near my flat, in larger venues, in pubs, literally hundreds and hundreds of venues…there is nothing of that scale, and ease of accessibility here in Boston as far as I can tell. But also, the type of music I like is much less popular here, so…there’s that.

In the past, sure…but compared to other cities Boston is not currently some massive generator of new music is it? (honestly asking). If you want to get deeply into the local music culture, sure, I’m sure there is tons to see/hear. – I am peripherally aware of that. But for the casual gig-goer, meh. There are great venues, and I love that about living here, but it seems to me that there are many other places with a much more open and accessible arts scene. If you go up to Portland, or even Salem, my sense is that music and other arts are just way more a part of community life.

I’m from London, which is obviously a way bigger city, and when I lived there I was in a different stage of my life so that will affect my perception too, but I would be out seeing new music every week – in small bars near my flat, in larger venues, in pubs, literally hundreds and hundreds of venues…there is nothing of that scale, and ease of accessibility here in Boston as far as I can tell. But also, the type of music I like is much less popular here, so…there’s that.

It’s like that in Boston too. Not as many larger venues as some places, but no shortage of smaller spaces. Some of the best shows in months happened, or are happening, in places like the Lilypad, Deep Thoughts, Greek American Social Club, O’Briens, Markus Basket, Toad, Lizard Lounge, etc and there are infinite more spaces. Accessibility is a valid complaint though (but even then, there are lots of mainstream very accessible bigger spots: Middle East, Sinclair, Royale, BMH, Paradise, etc). Portland has a good scene for its size. Same with Providence (where I live now) where arts are at its core, but neither have anything on the scale of the Boston metro. I have to be in Boston weekly, at least, to see the real good talent. London is MUCH MUCH larger than Boston too, so sure, I would expect more, like I would expect more in NYC or Chicago too.

In general, Boston is not much of a "counterculture" city. The arts are very institutionalized. One exception seems to be music, there are a lot of wonderful music venues in the city…but still, it’s not like there is a massive local scene or anything. I think the city is just too expensive.

As an answer to your question though – I think you should really focus on what school your daughter is going to attend: you don’t want to be a BC student in Davis, for instance, because you’ll just end up traipsing all the way back to Brighton to go out with friends. If she goes to BC, or BU then Allston is the area she’ll want to live in. If she goes to Harvard or MIT, Central or Inman Squares. If she goes to Tufts, Davis Square. If she goes to Northeastern, Mission Hill and maybe JP (JP being the bougie end of hipster).

She was looking at BC and Wellesley, and I think Wellesley is the winner. She’ll be living on campus where ever she ends up and doesn’t want to bring a car, so we were more interested in the geography of where the campuses are compared to where the hangouts are, and how good the transportation is between the two. She really enjoyed the time we spent in Cambridge, and Wellesley has an almost around-the-clock shuttle to Harvard Sq. and Central Sq. so the transportation piece is pretty simple.

A local friend suggested we check out Brighton when we have more time so we’ll do that and Allston on our next trip out there (we’re going back in the fall for less of a whirlwind visit). Overall she really liked Boston, more than D.C. even, and I got the sense that she won’t have a hard time finding the kinds of things she’s looking for there.