Cppcon the c++ conference gas stoichiometry practice

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The grand opening of the Gaylord Rockies, CppCon’s new home as of this year, was held this past weekend and they invited your Conference Chair (that would be me) and the team from our event management partners, Krueger Event Management (that would be Mike gas station near me and Karen Krueger), along with five hundred other event planners to spend the weekend. This gave the team at the GR (yes, that’s what we call it) a chance to show off the brand new convention center and what they can do with everything from food and beverage to decorating and AV.

Gaylord convention centers are known for their inspiring atriums and impressive public spaces and the Rockies lives up that reputation. The main atrium is designed in a mountain lodge style with a view that overlooks downtown Denver and the Rockies beyond. This is the center of the public space and is large enough to feature design elements like enormous (faux) boulders and a historic nineteenth century railroad caboose on a train track that goes over a bridge crossing a water feature fed by the indoor waterfall.

This area has plenty of casual seating and also dining tables served by “ski village” food and drink bars. It also connects the three main restaurants (one Asian, one Italian, and a steakhouse) and the sports bar, which seats five hundred and features the largest video screen in Colorado. Well, the largest indoor screen. Apparently, the one at the Bronco’s stadium is bigger.

To the left of the atrium, as you enter, is the spa, a huge fitness center, and an indoor electricity office/outdoor pool area that features a couple of water slides, one five-stories high, as well as a mile-long “ lazy river.” I didn’t pack a swim suit, but I regretted it as soon as we stepped into the pool area. Even for an old guy like me, it looks like a lot of fun. Don’t forget your suit.

We’ll have enough space to seat everyone in one room for plenary sessions (without resorting to an overflow room) for the foreseeable future. We’ll have enough breakout spaces that we can run the seven tracks that we have now and expand in the future with a possible academic track or other options. We’ll have the electricity estimated bills space to host the standard committee’s Low Latency and Game Developer Study Group (and perhaps other groups) under the same roof.

I don’t want to make a public commitment to anything that isn’t completely locked yet, but just as an example of what we can do with extra meeting space, we are working on a “quiet room.” This is a space with no conversation or phone calls, but with seating and power for charging stations and to work on slides or email. Or to just spend a few minutes of downtime in the middle of a long day.

As excited as I am about the additional meeting space, I’m even more excited about the ample public space. As we were outgrowing the Meydenbauer, we felt the pain first in the public areas. We use public space for the poster competition, exhibitor tables and booths, breaks and lunch concessions, the bookstore and author signings, public seating and whiteboards, registration and the information desk, and charging stations as well as its most important purpose, getting to sessions and talking with other power outage houston report attendees. This won’t be an issue at the GR convention center. As we were walking through the space this weekend, my comment to Karen and Mike was that it was an “embarrassment” of public space. The challenge for us as planners will be to make the best use of it. Not having enough public space won’t be an issue.

One of our top criteria for selecting a venue was finding a place where all attendees could be “ under one roof.” Although our previous home at the Meydenbauer Center was a great experience, we weren’t happy about having attendees in half a dozen hotels scattered across Bellevue. We feel that the conference experience will be enhanced by having everyone staying together.

Rooming at the GR will mean more opportunities to meet with other attendees and it will also make attending the conference less stressful. CppCon is packed with electricity in salt water experiment content which makes for a long, exhausting week (to nine days with classes). As Kate Gregory suggests, taking an afternoon nap may be a key survival technique. Knowing that your room is just an elevator ride away means you can get a cat nap in while missing only one session. It is also comforting to know that you don’t need to leave the building after attending a lightning talk session that types of electricity consumers ends at 10pm.

A key component of our preparation plan is involving local C++ programmers as much as possible. We are working with the North Denver Metro C++ Meetup group (thank you Jason and Scott), who are excited for us to make our new home near them. They are helping in several ways including working on the field trip (which we teased at the close of last year’s conference) and finding local partners such as an event/portrait photographer and a bookstore we can work with for books sales and author signings.

This last weekend’s trip was very valuable to Karen, Mike, and me because it was our first chance to see the GR, to meet members of the their team, and see them in action. Because it was their grand opening, while we asked a lot of questions, it wasn’t an opportunity for us to sit down with the team and do any serious planning. We’ve set up another visit when we’ll have the team’s undivided attention and can really sit down, roll up our sleeves, and plan for the best use of this marvelous space.

That meeting will be later this month. Karen and I will return and o gosh in addition to the GR team, we’ll be joined by Herb Sutter, President of the Standard C++ Foundation, the organization that is ultimately responsible for CppCon. During this trip we’ll also be meeting with local members of the planning committee, who will get their chance to tour the space.

At the formal closing of CppCon 2018, we took a moment to consider how far we’ve come in the first five years of the conference. Those years have seen us grow in so many ways. Since our first conference, we’ve added classes, field trips, author signings, exhibitor tables and booths, Tool Time, and the SG14 co-located ISO meeting. The number of main program sessions has grown by about fifty percent to almost one hundred gsa 2016 new orleans fifty. The number of Open Content sessions has doubled to about two dozen. The number of conference days (including classes) has doubled from four and a half to nine and the number of attendees has doubled from about six hundred to over twelve hundred. A new home

It is fitting that we take stock of our growth this year because we’ve reached an important milestone for the conference. We’ve out-grown our original venue. The home of the conference during it first five years has been the Meydenbauer Center, whose staff has played a critical role in our great success during those years . It was with a great deal of excitement and not a little sadness that we ended CppCon 2018 by announcing that CppCon 2019 will be in our new 3 gases that cause acid rain home at the Gaylord Rockies in Aurora, Colorado during the week of September 15th, 2019.

Open Content is just that, open! Attendees and regular program speakers alike can propose sessions on anything that interests them. These might feature a single facilitator leading a room through an exercise, activity or demo, a panel of 3-5 people taking questions from the room, a “hackathon” on a specific project, or an open conversation among the whole room. The projector is available for slides or public note taking.

Open Content is designed for flexibility so that a “Birds of a Feather” talk may be proposed even after the conference has begun. A speaker who gets a lot of post-talk questions may agree to host a QA session in the Open Content time. An attendee inspired by a session may host a session to explore a topic further or start on a group implementation of something.

These sessions will be open in another way too – Open Content does gas nozzle prank not require conference registration. That’s right, everyone who is in the area is welcome to come and join us for all the early morning/lunch/ evening sessions, including proposing or leading a session. This is part of our goal to be an inclusive conference for the entire C++ community. Free Friday