Cycling with medical conditions – bike forums gas prices in michigan

##

I have some odd ones myself. Thyroid/auto-immune disorder is one. Which does NOT help when I get into a low energy rut and then don’t exercise for months. I also have peripheral neuropathy (I’m not diabetic, but likely from being pre-diabetic for several years untreated – nobody told me the neuropathy can happen in that situation but my neurologist insists it can; wish I’d known that years ago) which has numbed my feet and hands, but so far it does not interfere with me riding. Though I’m really afraid to use clipless as I’d be worried I could not move fast enough or have the right amount of sensitivity to unlock in time.

I also have some bizarre "allergy" issues in that I’m allergic to – exercise! For real. One thing that can happen is called cholinergic urticaria, where I can break out in hives after exercise. Doesn’t always happen, and improves the better shape I’m in. It fades within an hour. But worse is exercise-induced anaphylaxis. If you have not heard of it you can Google it if curious but it looks pretty gross. My eyes can swell up, sometimes severely, even the white parts. I do carry an EpiPen as one or two times I felt a little in my mouth/throat, but I’ve gone about 10 years with it and other than looking like the elephant man and not being able to see very well when it happens, that’s been the worst. It can be inconvenient if it happens in the middle of nowhere and I have to ride back with my eyes all swelled up, and can take hours or sometimes even a day or two to subside. So far it hasn’t been too bad this spring, and I’ve actually had some rides where I was really exerting myself and it didn’t happen. Maybe at 48 I’ve outgrown it!

I have the exercise allergy thing too. A daily Zyrtec usually keeps it at bay. I have some mild asthma, and I tend to get sinus infections/bronchitis a lot. I don’t have to carry an inhaler anymore thankfully. I have hypoglycemia that ranges from mild to “why did I fall asleep on the kitchen floor?” Thankfully it’s mostly mild but I do carry glucose tablets.

Im also too clumsy to ride a bike, not that it’s stopped me. In the last few years I’ve dealt with a broken tailbone, a broken hand, dislocated fingers, sprains and strains, endless random bruises ect. Not all from the bike. The broken hand still makes riding uncomfortable. I just kind of try to keep going. The tailbone actually got better with frequent riding.

I had weight loss surgery 4 years ago. Some people think that’s the easy way out, and it is a very difficult process that leads to easier weight loss. But it’s absolutely not easy to keep the weight off. Cycling has given me a lifestyle that’s motivated me to keep it off. I have to work out pretty intensely and watch my diet but I want to be faster and stronger so I do it. I give pep talks to people going through the process and I explain that my body has fought me every step of the way, and it’s not been easy but I still do it. I say “I’m literally allergic to exercise, and yes that’s a real thing,” that always gets a big laugh.

This is hardly a clyde specific question (for better or worse) but I don’t know if I would say that I ride with medical conditions so much as I’m off the back of knee surgery number four. I’ve had four tibial tubercle osteotomies and two MPFL replacements (one per knee). The first two TTOs were done well but a lot of research was published shortly after they were done on how best to do them on patients with similar anatomical issues similar to mine. Cycling has been a part of my rehab for all four surgeries. It was also the tip off that I needed surgery to begin with because someone in their early 20s should not have knee pain when riding their bike.

I also have severe and chronic (treatment resistant) depression which is in no way shape or form helped by cycling or any other form of exercise. It’s honestly made a acutely worse when i’m on long rides because of how few other things are going on around me. That isn’t to say I don’t enjoy riding my bike, but doing something that I enjoy doesn’t mean that my depression goes away or gets better.