Daily star opinions grade 6 electricity project ideas

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The bill seeks to mandate the Department of Energy, National Renewable Energy Board and Housing and Urban Development Coordinating Council to encourage the installation of small solar energy systems in homes and business establishments all over the country.

It also asks the Department of Finance and other concerned agencies to create appropriate mechanisms for the grant of subsidies, establishment of guarantee funds, and provision of tax credits on the purchase and installation of small solar power systems for residential use.

Rising costs of electricity, fueled by historic highs in the price of oil and the weakness of the Philippine Peso makes it a priority for our government to find ways to encourage and increase the utilization of energy from renewable sources. A bill that hopes to empower the government agencies that make this happen can provide a welcome relief to those who are willing to invest in small scale renewable energy systems.

The people of a country that has one of the most expensive rates for electricity in Asia need to generate more of their own power and there are numerous technologies that can make it possible. With support from the government in the form of incentives, tax breaks and subsidies, we could harness renewable sources of energy, lower costs of living, and improve lives.*

The bill seeks to mandate the Department of Energy, National Renewable Energy Board and Housing and Urban Development Coordinating Council to encourage the installation of small solar energy systems in homes and business establishments all over the country.

It also asks the Department of Finance and other concerned agencies to create appropriate mechanisms for the grant of subsidies, establishment of guarantee funds, and provision of tax credits on the purchase and installation of small solar power systems for residential use.

Rising costs of electricity, fueled by historic highs in the price of oil and the weakness of the Philippine Peso makes it a priority for our government to find ways to encourage and increase the utilization of energy from renewable sources. A bill that hopes to empower the government agencies that make this happen can provide a welcome relief to those who are willing to invest in small scale renewable energy systems.

The people of a country that has one of the most expensive rates for electricity in Asia need to generate more of their own power and there are numerous technologies that can make it possible. With support from the government in the form of incentives, tax breaks and subsidies, we could harness renewable sources of energy, lower costs of living, and improve lives.*

In the report focusing on land-based strategies to remove plastic waste in oceans, Ocean Conservancy said the Philippines is among the five countries that contribute more than half of the plastic waste that enter our oceans. The country produces 2.7 million metric tons of plastic waste every year, with half a million metric tons believed to be exiting into the Pacific Ocean. Other countries cited in the report were China, Indonesia, Thailand and Vietnam.

“However, increasing economic power has also generated exploding demand for consumer products that has not yet been met with a commensurate waste-management infrastructure,” Ocean Conservancy added as it recommended coordinated action from those five countries in order to significantly reduce the leakage of plastic waste into the ocean.

The plastic waste leakage in the Philippines comes primarily from local plastic consumption. And while the country has a high collection rate of plastic, it was noted that between 70 to 90 percent of the waste dumped illegally in the country ultimately ends up in waterways.

A comparison of open dumps in the country revealed that over half were located within a kilometer from a waterway, increasing the possibility of waste exiting into the ocean. The study also revealed that 74 percent of plastic leaked into oceans comes from waste that has already been collected.

Ocean Conservancy recommends that countries like the Philippines address issues in its collection system. “There are relatively simple, fast, and inexpensive measures that have been shown to decrease leakage from dumpsites substantially.” It also recommended gasification, a process that utilizes plastic waste to produce synthesis gas that can potentially be used for electricity generation and the production of chemical fuel.

Our country will continue to be among the top contributors of plastic waste in our oceans for as long as Filipinos are not made aware of our responsibility to properly dispose such wastes so that our plastic-dependent lives do not negatively impact our planet. Filipino local governments, consumers and manufacturers will need to work together to find ways to reduce plastic use and waste so we can limit the impact our lives are making on the planet’s oceans.*