Dc-brushless-motor control device (nidec) electricity vs gasoline

In the related art, an electric vacuum cleaner provided with a converter circuit capable of freely and selectively performing switching between a boost operation mode and a non-boost operation mode in which a boost operation is not performed, has been known (for example, Japanese Unexamined Patent Application Publication No. 2003-135345). For this reason, boosting can be performed only when necessary, and thus it is said that the electric vacuum cleaner has a long battery use time per charging. That is, the electric vacuum cleaner has an energy saving effect.

However, when cleaning is actually performed, a strong suction force is continuously generated in many cases, and in Japanese Unexamined Patent Application Publication No. 2003-135345, the “power” mode is continuously selected in many cases. In that case, there is a problem in that the converter circuit capable of performing switching between the boost operation mode and the non-boost operation mode becomes useless.

According to an exemplary embodiment of the present disclosure, there is provided a DC-brushless-motor control device that supplies a current to windings of a stator of a three-phase DC brushless motor which rotates a negative pressure generation fan, the device including: a rectifier that rectifies an alternating current with a voltage of 300 V or less; a booster that boosts a voltage of the current rectified by the rectifier to 360 V or more; a three-phase bridge inverter that supplies the current boosted by the booster to the windings of the three-phase DC brushless motor; and a controller that controls a rotation speed of a rotor by controlling a conduction state of the three-phase bridge inverter based on a magnetic pole position detected by a magnetic pole position detector which detects a magnetic pole position of the rotor of the three-phase DC brushless motor.

The above and other elements, features, steps, characteristics and advantages of the present disclosure will become more apparent from the following detailed description of the preferred embodiments with reference to the attached drawings. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The suction apparatus 1 includes an operation switch 13, a DC-brushless-motor control device 15, a three-phase DC brushless motor 20, a rectifier 29, a booster 30, a first DC-DC converter 31, and a second DC-DC converter 32. The suction apparatus 1 generates a negative pressure by rotating a negative pressure generation fan (not illustrated) by the three-phase DC brushless motor 20. The DC-brushless-motor control device 15 includes a controller 16 and a three-phase bridge inverter 40. The controller 16 includes a micro controller unit (MCU) 17 and a driver 18. The MCU 17 includes an operation detection unit (not illustrated) that detects an operation of the operation switch 13. The three-phase DC brushless motor 20 includes a magnetic pole position detector 25. The DC-brushless-motor control device 15 supplies a current to windings 21, 22, and 23 of a stator of the three-phase DC brushless motor 20 which rotates a negative pressure generation fan.

The rectifier 29 rectifies an alternating current with a voltage of 300 V or less. Specifically, the rectifier 29 is connected to a commercial AC power supply. The commercial AC power supply includes a 100V-system power supply with a nominal voltage of 100 V, and a 230V-system power supply with a nominal voltage of 230 V. For example, the rectifier 29 is connected to the 100V-system commercial AC power supply or the 230V-system commercial AC power supply. In this case, the rectifier 29 rectifies a 100V-system AC or a 230V-system AC.

The booster 30 boosts a voltage of the current rectified by the rectifier 29, to 360 V or more. Thereby, the DC-brushless-motor control device 15 can control the three-phase bridge inverter 40 by the supply voltage of 360 V or more. Here, the boosted voltage may be a voltage other than 360 V.

The DC-brushless-motor control device 15 includes the second DC-DC converter 32. The second DC-DC converter 32 steps down the voltage of the current boosted by the booster 30, to 5 V or less. The second DC-DC converter 32 is an example of step-down circuitry. In this example, the second DC-DC converter 32 steps down the voltage of the current boosted by the booster 30, to 3.3 V which is an operation voltage of the controller 16.

The controller 16 operates by the current that is stepped down to 5 V or less by the second DC-DC converter 32. Thereby, the DC-brushless-motor control device 15 can operate the MCU 17 included in the controller 16 and the magnetic pole position detector 25 by the supply voltage which is stepped down by the second DC-DC converter 32. In this example, the controller 16 operates by the current that is stepped down to 3.3 V by the second DC-DC converter 32.