Development of warships if sails are kept around for longer page 3 alternate history discussion gas news australia

##########

Click to expand…Not necessarily–in such heavy seas, the Ship of the Line is going to be unable to open her lower gun ports for fear of taking gas vs electric oven review on too much water. Furthermore, both ships are going to be heaving or heeling so much that there is a real risk of being hulled below the waterline. Under the circumstances, neither captain is likely to want to pick a fight, because even a victory might leave them unable to make it back electricity 101 episode 1 to port easily with damage they’re unable to repair. Again, there’s also the fact that frigates could sail closer to the wind, meaning that speed becomes much less relevant if she’s trying to escape.

I don’t dispute you that if a frigate did somehow end up in combat with a SotL, the results will likely not be to the frigate’s advantage (with the possible exception of a US ’44 engaging an old 4th rate under la gasolina reggaeton explosion ideal circumstances). But the circumstances required for that to happen will be such that either the frigate captain will have (idiotically or recklessly) passed up many chances to escape, or the seas are heavy enough that both captains will be more 76 gas card payment concerned with preserving their own vessels than in engaging the enemy.

Anyway la gas prices, broadside guns don’t make sense as guns become heavier to penetrate armour. The preferred solution because the turret ship was not effective under sail was the central battery ironclad, which reached its finest form in HMS Temeraire (The Great Brig) and HMS Alexandra. Temeraire had 4 x 11in and 4 x 10in rifled muzzle loaders in a mix of barbettes and casemates and Alexandra had 2 x 11in and 8 x 10in. In 1897 Alexandra was fitted with 4 x 9.2in guns replacing the 11-inch natural gas in spanish RMLs, but this refit was not found particularly effective; the largest guns mounted in casemates in a new-built ship was the Russian coastal defence ship Gangut bearing 9in/30cal BLRs. The barbette mounts, even with the modern gas near me tripod-supported iron masts of British ironclads which had almost no standing rigging, would be restricted in size of gun to avoid fouling the rigging. So, I expect you would begin to see a uniform armament of 9-inch BLRs, probably gas weed around 10 of them, with 30 calibre barrels to get some use from smokeless powder, if you continued to have sails on heavy warships. They would displace up to 11,000 tons and generally two of the guns would be on deck in barbettes and the rest in casemates in the armoured central battery. The rest of the gaston yla agrupacion santa fe 2016 armament would consist of a mixture of casemated anti-torpedo boat guns and additional anti-torpedo boat guns mounted unprotected (except gun-shields) on the spar deck amidships, probably supplemented by underwater torpedo tubes. Typical speeds under sail would be around 10kts and you might see speeds not substantially change from 13 – 14 kts under engines because of a lack of technological investment.

Anyway, broadside guns don gas stoichiometry examples’t make sense as guns become heavier to penetrate armour. The preferred solution because the turret ship was not effective under sail was the central battery ironclad, which reached its finest form in HMS Temeraire gas house gang (The Great Brig) and HMS Alexandra. Temeraire had 4 x 11in and 4 x 10in rifled muzzle loaders in a mix of barbettes and casemates and Alexandra had 2 x 11in and 8 x 10in. In 1897 Alexandra was fitted with 4 x 9.2in guns replacing the 11-inch RMLs, but this refit gas in back trapped was not found particularly effective; the largest guns mounted in casemates in a new-built ship was the Russian coastal defence ship Gangut bearing 9in/30cal BLRs. The barbette mounts, even with the modern tripod-supported iron masts of British ironclads which had almost no standing rigging, would be restricted in size of gun to avoid fouling the rigging. So, I expect you would begin to see a uniform armament of 9-inch gas 91 octane BLRs, probably around 10 of them, with 30 calibre barrels to get some use from smokeless powder, if you continued to have sails on heavy warships. They would displace up to 11,000 tons and generally victaulic t gasket two of the guns would be on deck in barbettes and the rest in casemates in the armoured central battery. The rest of the armament would consist of a mixture of casemated anti-torpedo boat guns and additional anti-torpedo boat guns mounted unprotected (except gun-shields) on the spar electricity icon deck amidships, probably supplemented by underwater torpedo tubes. Typical speeds under sail would be around 10kts and you might see speeds not substantially change from 13 – 14 kts under engines because of a lack of technological investment.