Do you have any blindspots in your knowledge if not, why not if you now realise you do, what do you think they might be yahoo answers gas efficient cars 2010

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Most knowledge is like a + turning as an upward spiral. Each "know" is a "ledge" on an ~ infinite vertical or Archetypal Ideas insight stairway, and as one knows at second level what is known on first level, the know is like a turning upward spiral, from which second level one perceives the know in two dimensions; further dimensions are addable. Plato characterized this as https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Analogy_of… Cantor was more Dianoia —> infinity-Noesis about the process, Whitehead more of Truth-is-additive. Shakespeare’s plays are an example of spiraling knows.

"Known unknowns" is perhaps what you’re alluding to. Consider a young woman in a black-and-white environment, perhaps Plato’s Cave. She has on her screen all information about the color "red," including physiology, symbology, physics, etc. One fine day her screen flashes the color "red" (or perhaps she’s walked up the cave to see the Sun rise). This "knowing" is C. S. Lewis’ "looking along the Light," rather than looking "at the light" (as knowledge on a black-and-white screen). Even "two degrees" or levels permits at least a line to be connecting the "knows," and Shakespeare’s profundity re the human condition enables degrees of awareness and levels of awareness at the same time, for those who read and reread the Bard. ("Shakespeare’s Window into the Soul: The Mystical Wisdom in Shakespeare’s Characters" by Martin Lings.)

Most knowledge is like a + turning as an upward spiral. Each "know" is a "ledge" on an ~ infinite vertical or Archetypal Ideas insight stairway, and as one knows at second level what is known on first level, the know is like a turning upward spiral, from which second level one perceives the know in two dimensions; further dimensions are addable. Plato characterized this as https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Analogy_of… Cantor was more Dianoia —> infinity-Noesis about the process, Whitehead more of Truth-is-additive. Shakespeare’s plays are an example of spiraling knows.

"Known unknowns" is perhaps what you’re alluding to. Consider a young woman in a black-and-white environment, perhaps Plato’s Cave. She has on her screen all information about the color "red," including physiology, symbology, physics, etc. One fine day her screen flashes the color "red" (or perhaps she’s walked up the cave to see the Sun rise). This "knowing" is C. S. Lewis’ "looking along the Light," rather than looking "at the light" (as knowledge on a black-and-white screen). Even "two degrees" or levels permits at least a line to be connecting the "knows," and Shakespeare’s profundity re the human condition enables degrees of awareness and levels of awareness at the same time, for those who read and reread the Bard. ("Shakespeare’s Window into the Soul: The Mystical Wisdom in Shakespeare’s Characters" by Martin Lings.)

Most knowledge is like a + turning as an upward spiral. Each "know" is a "ledge" on an ~ infinite vertical or Archetypal Ideas insight stairway, and as one knows at second level what is known on first level, the know is like a turning upward spiral, from which second level one perceives the know in two dimensions; further dimensions are addable. Plato characterized this as https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Analogy_of… Cantor was more Dianoia —> infinity-Noesis about the process, Whitehead more of Truth-is-additive. Shakespeare’s plays are an example of spiraling knows.

"Known unknowns" is perhaps what you’re alluding to. Consider a young woman in a black-and-white environment, perhaps Plato’s Cave. She has on her screen all information about the color "red," including physiology, symbology, physics, etc. One fine day her screen flashes the color "red" (or perhaps she’s walked up the cave to see the Sun rise). This "knowing" is C. S. Lewis’ "looking along the Light," rather than looking "at the light" (as knowledge on a black-and-white screen). Even "two degrees" or levels permits at least a line to be connecting the "knows," and Shakespeare’s profundity re the human condition enables degrees of awareness and levels of awareness at the same time, for those who read and reread the Bard. ("Shakespeare’s Window into the Soul: The Mystical Wisdom in Shakespeare’s Characters" by Martin Lings.)