Dominion’s long-term plan includes more natural gas, solar 3 gases that cause acid rain

##

Overall, Dominion’s modeling provided to AP shows renewables would move from 3 percent of its 2017 capacity mix — what the company is capable of producing — to as much as 9 percent under some scenarios by 2033. Natural gas would increase from 38 percent of the capacity mix in 2017 to as much as 59 percent, while coal would shrink from 21 percent to no more than 15 percent.

Despite the Trump administration’s efforts to do away with the Obama-era Clean Power Plan, Dominion says it expects power stations’ emissions of carbon dioxide, a key greenhouse gas, are still virtually certain be regulated. The resource plan offers five scenarios that vary based on what kind of regulatory conditions are presumed to exist.

Under all five variations, plans call for the increase in solar as well as the addition of at least eight natural gas-fired facilities with a combined capacity of between 3,500-5,000 megawatts, Koonce said. That’s about the same additional capacity as was called for in last year’s resource plan, he said.

Overall, Dominion’s modeling provided to AP shows renewables would move from 3 percent of its 2017 capacity mix – what the company capable of producing – to as much as 9 percent under some scenarios by 2033. Natural gas would increase from 38 percent of the capacity mix in 2017 to as much as 59 percent, while coal would shrink from 21 percent to no more than 15 percent.

Despite the Trump administration’s efforts to do away with the Obama-era Clean Power Plan, Dominion says it expects power stations’ emissions of carbon dioxide, a key greenhouse gas, are still virtually certain be regulated. The resource plan offers five scenarios that vary based on what kind of regulatory conditions are presumed to exist.

Under all five variations, plans call for the increase in solar as well as the addition of at least eight natural gas-fired facilities with a combined capacity of between 3,500-5,000 megawatts, Koonce said. That’s about the same additional capacity as was called for in last year’s resource plan, he said.

The natural gas plants are necessary partly because of expected load growth, partly because of the intermittent nature of solar power and partly because of the planned retirement of around 3,000 megawatts of generation powered by less efficient coal and oil plants, he said.

Earlier this year, Dominion announced it was putting many of those less efficient plants into "cold reserve," essentially a dormant status. Those stations will likely be retired under the plan, as would two oil-fired units, one each at the Possum Point and Yorktown power stations, Koonce said.

While all variations of the plan envision the relicensing of the company’s four existing nuclear units at the Surry and North Anna stations, none calls for a third reactor at North Anna, which Dominion has been contemplating. The company has already spent hundreds of millions on preparation costs.

Overall, Dominion’s modeling provided to AP shows renewables would move from 3 percent of its 2017 capacity mix — what the company is capable of producing — to as much as 9 percent under some scenarios by 2033. Natural gas would increase from 38 percent of the capacity mix in 2017 to as much as 59 percent, while coal would shrink from 21 percent to no more than 15 percent.

Despite the Trump administration’s efforts to do away with the Obama-era Clean Power Plan, Dominion says it expects power stations‘ emissions of carbon dioxide, a key greenhouse gas, are still virtually certain be regulated. The resource plan offers five scenarios that vary based on what kind of regulatory conditions are presumed to exist.

Under all five variations, plans call for the increase in solar as well as the addition of at least eight natural gas-fired facilities with a combined capacity of between 3,500-5,000 megawatts, Koonce said. That’s about the same additional capacity as was called for in last year’s resource plan, he said.

Overall, Dominion’s modeling provided to AP shows renewables would move from 3 percent of its 2017 capacity mix — what the company is capable of producing — to as much as 9 percent under some scenarios by 2033. Natural gas would increase from 38 percent of the capacity mix in 2017 to as much as 59 percent, while coal would shrink from 21 percent to no more than 15 percent.

Despite the Trump administration’s efforts to do away with the Obama-era Clean Power Plan, Dominion says it expects power stations‘ emissions of carbon dioxide, a key greenhouse gas, are still virtually certain be regulated. The resource plan offers five scenarios that vary based on what kind of regulatory conditions are presumed to exist.

Under all five variations, plans call for the increase in solar as well as the addition of at least eight natural gas-fired facilities with a combined capacity of between 3,500-5,000 megawatts, Koonce said. That’s about the same additional capacity as was called for in last year’s resource plan, he said.

The natural gas plants are necessary partly because of expected load growth, partly because of the intermittent nature of solar power and partly because of the planned retirement of around 3,000 megawatts of generation powered by less efficient coal and oil plants, he said.

Earlier this year, Dominion announced it was putting many of those less efficient plants into "cold reserve," essentially a dormant status. Those stations will likely be retired under the plan, as would two oil-fired units, one each at the Possum Point and Yorktown power stations, Koonce said.

While all variations of the plan envision the relicensing of the company’s four existing nuclear units at the Surry and North Anna stations, none calls for a third reactor at North Anna, which Dominion has been contemplating. The company has already spent hundreds of millions on preparation costs.