Driving a car without catalytic converter – car talk – nigeria gas city indiana restaurants

Your car will run pretty rough. I would imagine your car was built after 1999, and so will have 2 lambda sensors. one before the catalyst, the other after (downstream). The downstream probe is designed to measure hydrocarbons AFTER the catalyst, which is now missing. Then it sends data back to your ECU, by which a fuel map is created. This will alter the duty cycle of your injectors (duration they remain open) thus regulating fuel use.

With your catalyst missing, your downstream lambda probe (Oxygen sensor) will feed your ECU wrong data, which will try to compensate your fuel trim. It will over fuel like mad. Too much fuel going into your cylinders, over a period of time, will cause engine damage, due to "bore wash". This is whereby excess fuel washes the vital oil lubrication from your cylinder bores, causing premature wear. Your engine will begin burning oil, resulting in high oil consumption, visible as blue smoke. Diluting petrol with oil will result in a very low octane, which couple with a hot operating environment, will cause detonation, which could lead to holes being blown into your piston crowns. Or worse, if severe enough, detonation occurring whilst your piston‘s on its compression stroke could bend a rod. This could cause a conrod and piston to smash through the side of your engine block.

Very tech, but I dont fully agree. The function of the second sensor is not to determine the fuel mixture. And the main sensor works independent of the Cat. read better here http://101carsense.blogspot.com/2013/07/popular-but-wrong.html Siena:

Your car will run pretty rough. I would imagine your car was built after 1999, and so will have 2 lambda sensors. one before the catalyst, the other after (downstream). The downstream probe is designed to measure hydrocarbons AFTER the catalyst, which is now missing. Then it sends data back to your ECU, by which a fuel map is created. This will alter the duty cycle of your injectors (duration they remain open) thus regulating fuel use.

With your catalyst missing, your downstream lambda probe (Oxygen sensor) will feed your ECU wrong data, which will try to compensate your fuel trim. It will over fuel like mad. Too much fuel going into your cylinders, over a period of time, will cause engine damage, due to "bore wash". This is whereby excess fuel washes the vital oil lubrication from your cylinder bores, causing premature wear. Your engine will begin burning oil, resulting in high oil consumption, visible as blue smoke. Diluting petrol with oil will result in a very low octane, which couple with a hot operating environment, will cause detonation, which could lead to holes being blown into your piston crowns. Or worse, if severe enough, detonation occurring whilst your piston‘s on its compression stroke could bend a rod. This could cause a conrod and piston to smash through the side of your engine block.

So I’ll ask you – is there any sensible reason to run your modern car without a catalyst? You honestly listen to your "mechanic" who thinks it’s a good idea to delete it? Where did you hear removal of a catalyst decreases fuel consumption? Re: Driving A Car Without Catalytic Converter by nissparts( m): 12:22pm On Jul 01, 2013

Your car will run pretty rough. I would imagine your car was built after 1999, and so will have 2 lambda sensors. one before the catalyst, the other after (downstream). The downstream probe is designed to measure hydrocarbons AFTER the catalyst, which is now missing. Then it sends data back to your ECU, by which a fuel map is created. This will alter the duty cycle of your injectors (duration they remain open) thus regulating fuel use.

With your catalyst missing, your downstream lambda probe (Oxygen sensor) will feed your ECU wrong data, which will try to compensate your fuel trim. It will over fuel like mad. Too much fuel going into your cylinders, over a period of time, will cause engine damage, due to "bore wash". This is whereby excess fuel washes the vital oil lubrication from your cylinder bores, causing premature wear. Your engine will begin burning oil, resulting in high oil consumption, visible as blue smoke. Diluting petrol with oil will result in a very low octane, which couple with a hot operating environment, will cause detonation, which could lead to holes being blown into your piston crowns. Or worse, if severe enough, detonation occurring whilst your piston‘s on its compression stroke could bend a rod. This could cause a conrod and piston to smash through the side of your engine block.